(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "In the fog"

RICHARD HARMlfG i)AVIS 




LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY Or 
CALIFORNIA 

SAN DIEGO 



J 




IN THE FOG 



BY THE SAME AUTHOR 

SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE. Crown 
8vo., price 6s. Illustrated. 

THE KING'S JACKAL. Crown 8vo., 

price 33. 6d. Illustrated. 



THE CUBAN AND PORTO-RICAN 
CAMPAIGNS. With 119 Illustrations from 
Photographs and Drawings on the Spot, and 
Maps. Crown 8vo., cloth, price 75. 6d. net. 

CUBA IN WARTIME. With numerous 
Illustrations by FREDERIC REMINGTON. Crown 
8vo., price 35. 6d. 

LONDON: WILLIAM HEINEMANN 
21 BEDFORD STREET, W.C. 




"She knew she \voukl be twenty thousand pounds richer. 



IN THE FOG 



BY 

Richard Harding T)avis 

ILLUSTRATED BY 

FREDERIC DORR STEELE 




LONDON 

WILLIAM HEINEMANN 
1902 



Copyright, and entered at Stationers' Hall November 20, 1901 



This Edition enjoys copyright in 
all countries signatory to the Berne 
Treaty, and is not to be imported 
into the United States of America 



r 

/IDemorg 

OF 

CHATLEY HARKAWAY, 

"A GENTLEMAN OF ENGLAND" 



ILLUSTRATIONS 

" She knew she would be twenty thousand 

pounds richer "... Frontispiece 

" The men around the table turned and 

glanced toward the gentleman in 

front of the fireplace " . . To face page 14. 

'' I rushed across the room and threw out 

everything on the bed " 94 

" In the drawing-room we found the body 

of the Princess Zichy " . . 126 

" What was the object of your plot ?" . 1 54. 



CHAPTER I 

THE Grill is the club most 
difficult of access in the world. 
To be placed on its rolls distin 
guishes the new member as greatly 
as though he had received a vacant 
Garter or had been caricatured in 
"Vanity Fair." 

Men who belong to the Grill Club 
never mention that fact. If you were 
to ask one of them which clubs he fre 
quents, he will name all save that par 
ticular one. He is afraid if he told 
you he belonged to the Grill, that it 
would sound like boasting. 

The Grill Club dates back to the days 
when Shakespeare's Theatre stood on 
the present site of the " Times " office. 
It has a golden Grill which Charles 
the Second presented to the Club, 
9 



IN THE FOG 



and the original manuscript of "Tom 
and Jerry in London," which was 
bequeathed to it by Pierce Egan him 
self. The members, when they write 
letters at the Club, still use sand to 
blot the ink. 

The Grill enjoys the distinction of 
having blackballed, without political 
prejudice, a Prime Minister of each 
party. At the same sitting at which 
one of these fell, it elected, on account 
of his brogue and his bulls, Quiller, 
Q. C., who was then a penniless bar 
rister. 

When Paul Preval, the French artist 
who came to London by royal com 
mand to paint a portrait of the Prince 
of Wales, was made an honorary mem 
ber only foreigners may be honorary 
members he said, as he signed his 
first wine card, " I would rather see 
my name on that, than on a picture 
in the Louvre." 

10 



IN THE FOG 



At which Quiller remarked, " That is 
a devil of a compliment, because the 
only men who can read their names in 
the Louvre to-day have been dead fifty 
years." 

On the night after the great fog of 
1897 there were five members in the 
Club, four of them busy with supper 
and one reading in front of the fire 
place. There is only one room to the 
Club, and one long table. At the far 
end of the room the fire of the grill 
glows red, and, when the fat falls, 
blazes into flame, and at the other 
there is a broad bow window of dia 
mond panes, which looks down upon 
the street. The four men at the table 
were strangers to each other, but as 
they picked at the grilled bones, and 
sipped their Scotch and soda, they 
conversed with such charming anima 
tion that a visitor to the Club, which 
does not tolerate visitors, would have 
11 



counted them as friends of long ac 
quaintance, certainly not as English 
men who had met for the first time, 
and without the form of an introduc 
tion. But it is the etiquette and tradi 
tion of the Grill, that whoever enters it 
must speak with whomever he finds 
there. It is to enforce this rule that 
there is but one long table, and whether 
there are twenty men at it or two, the 
waiters, supporting the rule, will place 
them side by side. 

For this reason the four strangers at 
supper were seated together, with the 
candles grouped about them, and the 
long length of the table cutting a white 
path through the outer gloom. 

"I repeat," said the gentleman with 
the black pearl stud, " that the days for 
romantic adventure and deeds of fool 
ish daring have passed, and that the 
fault lies with ourselves. Voyages to 
the pole I do not catalogue as adven- 
12 



IN THE FOG 



tures. That African explorer, young 
Chetney, who turned up yesterday after 
he was supposed to have died in 
Uganda, did nothing adventurous. He 
made maps and explored the sources of 
rivers. He was in constant danger, but 
the presence of danger does not con 
stitute adventure. Were that so, the 
chemist who studies high explosives, 
or who investigates deadly poisons, 
passes through adventures daily. No, 
1 adventures are for the adventurous.' 
But one no longer ventures. The spirit 
of it has died of inertia. We are 
grown too practical, too just, above 
all, too sensible. In this room, for in 
stance, members of this Club have, at 
the sword's point, disputed the proper 
scanning of one of Pope's couplets. 
Over so weighty a matter as spilled 
Burgundy on a gentleman's cuff, ten 
men fought across this table, each with 
his rapier in one hand and a candle 
13 



IN THE FOG 



in the other. All ten were wounded. 
The question of the spilled Burgundy 
concerned but two of them. The eight 
others engaged because they were men 
of ' spirit.' They were, indeed, the first 
gentlemen of the day. To-night, were 
you to spill Burgundy on my cuff, were 
you even to insult me grossly, these 
gentlemen would not consider it incum 
bent upon them to kill each other. 
They would separate us, and to-morrow 
morning appear as witnesses against us 
at Bow Street. We have here to-night, 
in the persons of Sir Andrew and my 
self, an illustration of how the ways 
have changed." 

The men around the table turned 
and glanced toward the gentleman in 
front of the fireplace. He was an 
elderly and somewhat portly person, 
with a kindly, wrinkled countenance, 
which wore continually a smile of al 
most childish confidence and good- 
14 



/ N THE FOG 



nature. It was a face which the 
illustrated prints had made intimately 
familiar. He held a book from him at 
arm's-length, as if to adjust his eye 
sight, and his brows were knit with 
interest. 

" Now, were this the eighteenth cen 
tury," continued the gentleman with 
the black pearl, "when Sir Andrew 
left the Club to-night I would have 
him bound and gagged and thrown 
into a sedan chair. The watch would 
not interfere, the passers-by would take 
to their heels, my hired bullies and 
ruffians would convey him to some 
lonely spot where we would guard him 
until morning. Nothing would come 
of it, except added reputation to my 
self as a gentleman of adventurous 
spirit, and possibly an essay in the 
'Tatler,' with stars for names, en 
titled, let us say, ' The Budget and 
the Baronet.'" 

15 



IN THE FOG 



" But to what end, sir? " inquired 
the youngest of the members. "And 
why Sir Andrew, of all persons why 
should you select him for this adven 
ture? " 

The gentleman with the black pearl 
shrugged his shoulders. 

" It would prevent him speaking in 
the House to-night. The Navy In 
crease Bill," he added gloomily. "It 
is a Government measure, and Sir 
Andrew speaks for it. And so great is 
his influence and so large his follow 
ing that if he does" the gentleman 
laughed ruefully "if he does, it will 
go through. Now, had I the spirit of 
our ancestors," he exclaimed, "I would 
bring chloroform from the nearest 
chemist's and drug him in that chair. 
I would tumble his unconscious form 
into a hansom cab, and hold him pris 
oner until daylight. If I did, I would 
save the British taxpayer the cost of 
16 



IN THE FOG 



five more battleships, many millions 
of pounds." 

The gentlemen again turned, and 
surveyed the baronet with freshened 
interest. The honorary member of the 
Grill, whose accent already had be 
trayed him as an American, laughed 
softly. 

" To look at him now," he said, " one 
would not guess he was deeply con 
cerned with the affairs of state." 

The others nodded silently. 

" He has not lifted his eyes from 
that book since we first entered," added 
the youngest member. " He surely 
cannot mean to speak to-night." 

" Oh, yes, he will speak," muttered 
the one with the black pearl moodily. 
" During these last hours of the session 
the House sits late, but when the Navy 
bill comes up on its third reading he 
will be in his place and he will pass 
it." 

17 



IN THE FOG 



The fourth member, a stout and florid 
gentleman of a somewhat sporting 
appearance, in a short smoking-jacket 
and black tie, sighed enviously. 

" Fancy one of us being as cool as 
that, if he knew he had to stand up 
within an hour and rattle off a speech 
in Parliament. I 'd be in a devil of a 
funk myself. And yet he is as keen 
over that book he 's reading as though 
he had nothing before him until bed 
time." 

"Yes, see how eager he is," whis 
pered the youngest member. " He does 
not lift his eyes even now when he 
cuts the pages. It is probably an Ad 
miralty Report, or some other weighty 
work of statistics which bears upon his 
speech." 

The gentleman with the black pearl 
laughed morosely. 

"The weighty work in which the 
eminent statesman is so deeply en- 
18 



/ N THE FOG 



grossed," he said, " is called ' The Great 
Eand Robbery.' It is a detective novel, 
for sale at all bookstalls." 

The American raised his eyebrows 
in disbelief. 

"'The Great Rand Robbery 'f " he 
repeated incredulously. "What an 
odd taste!" 

" It is not a taste, it is his vice," 
returned the gentleman with the pearl 
stud. " It is his one dissipation. He is 
noted for it. You, as a stranger, could 
hardly be expected to know of this 
idiosyncrasy. Mr. Gladstone sought 
relaxation in the Greek poets, Sir 
Andrew finds his in Gaboriau. Since 
I have been a member of Parliament I 
have never seen him in the library 
without a shilling shocker in his hands. 
He brings them even into the sacred 
precincts of the House, and from the 
Government benches reads them con 
cealed inside his hat. Once started on 

19 



IN THE FOG 



a tale of murder, robbery, and sudden 
death, nothing can tear him from it, 
not even the call of the division bell, 
nor of hunger, nor the prayers of the 
party Whip. He gave up his country 
house because when he journeyed to 
it in the train he would become so 
absorbed in his detective stories that 
he was invariably carried past his sta 
tion." The member of Parliament 
twisted his pearl stud nervously, and 
bit at the edge of his mustache. "If it 
only were the first pages of ' The Rand 
Kobbery' that he were reading," he 
murmured bitterly, " instead of the 
last ! With such another book as that, 
I swear I could hold him here until 
morning. There would be no need of 
chloroform to keep him from the 
House." 

The eyes of all were fastened upon 
Sir Andrew, and each saw with fascina 
tion that with his forefinger he was 
20 



IN THE FOG 



now separating the last two pages of 
the book. The member of Parliament 
struck the table softly with his open 
palm. 

"I would give a hundred pounds," 
he whispered, " if I could place in his 
hands at this moment a new story of 
Sherlock Holmes a thousand pounds," 
he added wildly "five thousand 
pounds ! ' : 

The American observed the speaker 
sharply, as though the words bore to 
him some special application, and then 
at an idea which apparently had but 
just come to him, smiled in great em 
barrassment. 

Sir Andrew ceased reading, but, as 
though still under the influence of the 
book, sat looking blankly into the open 
fire. For a brief space no one moved 
until the baronet withdrew his eyes 
and, with a sudden start of recollec 
tion, felt anxiously for his watch. He 
21 



IN T H E F O G 



scanned its face eagerly, and scrambled 
to his feet. 

The voice of the American instantly 
broke the silence in a high, nervous 
accent. 

" And yet Sherlock Holmes himself," 
he cried, " could not decipher the mys 
tery which to-night baffles the police 
of London." 

At these unexpected words, which 
carried in them something of the tone 
of a challenge, the gentlemen about 
the table started as suddenly as though 
the American had fired a pistol in the 
air, and Sir Andrew halted abruptly 
and stood observing him with grave 
surprise. 

The gentleman with the black pearl 
was the first to recover. 

"Yes, yes," he said eagerly, throw 
ing himself across the table. " A mys 
tery that baffles the police of London. 
22 



IN THE FOG 



I have heard nothing of it. Tell us at 
once, pray do tell us at once." 

The American flushed uncomfort 
ably, and picked uneasily at the table 
cloth. 

" No one but the police has heard 
of it," he murmured, " and they only 
through me. It is a remarkable crime, 
to which, unfortunately, I am the only 
person who can bear witness. Because 
I am the only witness, I am, in spite 
of my immunity as a diplomat, de 
tained in London by the authorities of 
Scotland Yard. My name," he said, 
inclining his head politely, " is Sears, 
Lieutenant Ripley Sears of the United 
States Navy, at present Naval Attache 
to the Court of Russia. Had I not 
been detained to-day by the police I 
would have started this morning for 
Petersburg." 

The gentleman with the black pearl 
interrupted with so pronounced an ex- 
23 



IN THE FOG 

clamation of excitement and delight 
that the American stammered and 
ceased speaking. 

" Do you hear, Sir Andrew? " cried 
the member of Parliament jubilantly. 
" An American diplomat halted by our 
police because he is the only witness 
of a most remarkable crime the most 
remarkable crime, I believe you said, 
sir," he added, bending eagerly toward 
the naval officer, " which has occurred 
in London in many years." 

The American moved his head in 
assent and glanced at the two other 
members. They were looking doubt 
fully at him, and the face of each 
showed that he was greatly perplexed. 

Sir Andrew advanced to within the 
light of the candles and drew a chair 
toward him. 

" The crime must be exceptional in 
deed," he said, "to justify the police 
in interfering with a representative of 
24 



IN THE FOG 



a friendly power. If I were not forced 
to leave at once, I should take the 
liberty of asking you to tell us the 
details." 

The gentleman with the pearl pushed 
the chair toward Sir Andrew, and mo 
tioned him to be seated. 

"You cannot leave us now," he ex 
claimed. " Mr. Sears is just about to 
tell us of this remarkable crime." 

He nodded vigorously at the naval 
officer and the American, after first 
glancing doubtfully toward the serv 
ants at the far end of the room, 
leaned forward across the table. The 
others drew their chairs nearer and 
bent toward him. The baronet glanced 
irresolutely at his watch, and with an 
exclamation of annoyance snapped 
down the lid. "They can wait," he 
muttered. He seated himself quickly 
and nodded at Lieutenant Sears. 
25 



IN THE FOG 



" If you will be so kind as to begin, 
sir," he said impatiently. 

"Of course," said the American, 
" you understand that I understand that 
I am speaking to gentlemen. The con 
fidences of this Club are inviolate. 
Until the police give the facts to the 
public press, I must consider you my 
confederates. You have heard noth 
ing, you know no one connected with 
this mystery. Even I must remain 
anonymous." 

The gentlemen seated around him 
nodded gravely. 

"Of course," the baronet assented 
with eagerness, " of course." 

"We will refer to it," said the gen 
tleman with the black pearl, " as ' The 
Story of the Naval Attache.' " 

" I arrived in London two days ago," 

said the American, " and I engaged a 

room at the Bath Hotel. I know very 

few people in London, and even the 

26 



IN THE FOG 



members of our embassy were stran 
gers to me. But in Hong Kong I had 
become great pals with an officer in 
your navy, who has since retired, and 
who is now living in a small house in 
Rutland Gardens opposite the Knights- 
bridge barracks. I telegraphed him 
that I was in London, and yesterday 
morning I received a most hearty invi 
tation to dine with him the same even 
ing at his house. He is a bachelor, so 
we dined alone and talked over all our 
old days on the Asiatic Station, and of 
the changes which had come to us since 
we had last met there. As I was leav 
ing the next morning for my post at 
Petersburg, and had many letters to 
write, I told him, about ten o'clock, 
that I must get back to the hotel, and 
he sent out his servant to call a 
hansom. 

" For the next quarter of an hour, as 
we sat talking, we could hear the cab 
27 



IN THE FOG 



whistle sounding violently from the 
doorstep, but apparently with no result. 

"'It cannot be that the cabmen are 
on strike,' my friend said, as he rose 
and walked to the window. 

" He pulled back the curtains and at 
once called to me. 

" ' You have never seen a London fog, 
have you! ' he asked. ' Well, come 
here. This is one of the best, or, 
rather, one of the worst, of them.' I 
joined him at the window, but I could 
see nothing. Had I not known that 
the house looked out upon the street 
I would have believed that I was facing 
a dead wall. I raised the sash and 
stretched out my head, but still I could 
see nothing. Even the light of the 
street lamps opposite, and in the upper 
windows of the barracks, had been 
smothered in the yellow mist. The 
lights of the room in which I stood 
28 



IN THE FOG 



penetrated the fog only to the distance 
of a few inches from my eyes. 

" Below me the servant was still 
sounding his whistle, but I could afford 
to wait no longer, and told my friend 
that I would try and find the way to 
my hotel on foot. He objected, but 
the letters I had to write were for the 
Navy Department, and, besides, I had 
always heard that to be out in a Lon 
don fog was the most wonderful expe 
rience, and I was curious to investigate 
one for myself. 

" My friend went with me to his front 
door, and laid down a course for me to 
follow. I was first to walk straight 
across the street to the brick wall of the 
Knightsbridge Barracks. I was then 
to feel my way along the wall until I 
came to a row of houses set back from 
the sidewalk. They would bring me to 
a cross street. On the other side of 
this street was a row of shops which I 
29 



IN THE FOG 



was to follow until they joined the iron 
railings of Hyde Park. I was to keep 
to the railings until I reached the gates 
at Hyde Park Corner, where I was to 
lay a diagonal course across Piccadilly, 
and tack in toward the railings of 
Green Park. At the end of these rail 
ings, going east, I would find the Wal- 
singham, and my own hotel. 

" To a sailor the course did not seem 
difficult, so I bade my friend good 
night and walked forward until my feet 
touched the paving. I continued upon 
it until I reached the curbing of the 
sidewalk. A few steps further, and 
my hands struck the wall of the bar 
racks. I turned in the direction from 
which I had just come, and saw a 
square of faint light cut in the yellow 
fog. I shouted ' All right,' and the 
voice of my friend answered, ' Good 
luck to you.' The light from his open 
door disappeared with a bang, and I 
30 



/ N THE FOG 



was left alone in a dripping, yellow 
darkness. I have been in the Navy 
for ten years, but I have never known 
such a fog as that of last night, not 
even among the icebergs of Behring 
Sea. There one at least could see the 
light of the binnacle, but last night I 
could not even distinguish the hand by 
which I guided myself along the bar 
rack wall. At sea a fog is a natural 
phenomenon. It is as familiar as the 
rainbow which follows a storm, it is as 
proper that a fog should spread upon 
the waters as that steam shall rise from 
a kettle. But a fog which springs from 
the paved streets, that rolls between 
solid house-fronts, that forces cabs to 
move at half speed, that drowns police 
men and extinguishes the electric lights 
of the music hall, that to me is incom 
prehensible. It is as out of place as a 
tidal wave in Hyde Park. 

" As I felt my way along the wall, I 
31 



I N THE FOG 



encountered other men who were com 
ing from the opposite direction, and 
each time when we hailed each other I 
stepped away from the wall to make 
room for them to pass. But the third 
time I did this, when I reached out my 
hand, the wall had disappeared, and 
the further I moved to find it the 
further I seemed to be sinking into 
space. I had the unpleasant conviction 
that at any moment I might step over 
a precipice. Since I had set out I had 
heard no traffic in the street, and now, 
although I listened some minutes, I 
could only distinguish the occasional 
footfalls of pedestrians. Several times 
I called aloud, and once a jocular gen 
tleman answered me, but only to ask 
me where I thought he was, and then 
even he was swallowed up in the 
silence. Just above me I could make 
out a jet of gas which I guessed came 
from a street lamp, and I moved over 

32 



/ N THE FOG 



to that, and, while I tried to recover 
my bearings, kept my hand on the iron 
post. Except for this flicker of gas, no 
larger than the tip of my finger, I could 
distinguish nothing about me. For the 
rest, the mist hung between me and the 
world like a damp and heavy blanket. 

" I could hear voices, but I could not 
tell from whence they came, and the 
scrape of a foot moving cautiously, or 
a muffled cry as some one stumbled, 
were the only sounds that reached me. 

" I decided that until some one took 
me in tow I had best remain where I 
was, and it must have been for ten min 
utes that I waited by the lamp, straining 
my ears and hailing distant footfalls. 
In a house near me some people were 
dancing to the music of a Hungarian 
band. I even fancied I could hear the 
windows shake to the rhythm of their 
feet, but I could not make out from 
which part of the compass the sounds 
3 33 



IN THE FOG 



came. And sometimes, as the music 
rose, it seemed close at my hand, and 
again, to be floating high in the air above 
my head. Although I was surrounded 
by thousands of householders 13 I 
was as completely lost as though I had 
been set down by night in the Sahara 
Desert. There seemed to be no reason 
in waiting longer for an escort, so I 
again set out, and at once bumped 
against a low iron fence. At first I be 
lieved this to be an area railing, but on 
following it I found that it stretched for 
a long distance, and that it was pierced 
at regular intervals with gates. I was 
standing uncertainly with my hand on 
one of these when a square of light sud 
denly opened in the night, and in it I 
saw, as you see a picture thrown by a 
biograph in a darkened theatre, a young 
gentleman in evening dress, and back of 
him the lights of a hall. I guessed from 
its elevation and distance from the side- 
34 



IN THE FOG 



walk that this light must come from 
the door of a house set back from the 
street, and I determined to approach 
it and ask the young man to tell me 
where I was. But in fumbling with 
the lock of the gate I instinctively bent 
my head, and when 1 raised it again 
the door had partly closed, leaving only 
a narrow shaft of light. Whether the 
young man had re-entered the house, 
or had left it I could not tell, but I 
hastened to open the gate, and as I 
stepped forward I found myself upon 
an asphalt walk. At the same instant 
there was the sound of quick steps 
upon the path, and some one rushed 
past me. I called to him, but he made 
no reply, and I heard the gate click and 
the footsteps hurrying away upon the 
sidewalk. 

"Under other circumstances the 
young man's rudeness, and his reckless 
ness in dashing so hurriedly through 
35 



THE FOG 



the mist, would have struck me as 
peculiar, but everything was so dis 
torted by the fog that at the moment I 
did not consider it. The door was still 
as he had left it, partly open. I went 
up the path, and, after much fumbling, 
found the knob of the door-bell and 
gave it a sharp pull. The bell an 
swered me from a great depth and 
distance, but no movement followed 
from inside the house, and although I 
pulled the bell again and again I could 
hear nothing save the dripping of the 
mist about me. I was anxious to be 
on my way, but unless I knew where 
I was going there was little chance of 
my making any speed, and I was deter 
mined that until I learned my bearings 
I would not venture back into the fog. 
So I pushed the door open and stepped 
into the house. 

" I found myself in a long and nar 
row hall, upon which doors opened 
36 



IN THE FOG 



from either side. At the end of the 
hall was a staircase with a balustrade 
which ended in a sweeping curve. The 
balustrade was covered with heavy Per 
sian rugs, and the walls of the hall were 
also hung with them. The door on my 
left was closed, but the one nearer me 
on the right was open, and as I stepped 
opposite to it I saw that it was a sort 
of reception or waiting-room, and that 
it was empty. The door below it was 
also open, and with the idea that I 
would surely find some one there, I 
walked on up the hall. I was in even 
ing dress, and I felt I did not look like 
a burglar, so I had no great fear that, 
should I encounter one of the inmates 
of the house, he would shoot me on 
sight. The second door in the hall 
opened into a dining-room. This was 
also empty. One person had been 
dining at the table, but the cloth had 
not been cleared away, and a flickering 
37 



IN THE FOG 



candle showed half-filled wineglasses 
and the ashes of cigarettes. The greater 
part of the room was in complete 
darkness. 

" By this time I had grown conscious 
of the fact that I was wandering about 
in a strange house, and that, apparently, 
I was alone in it. The silence of the 
place began to try my nerves, and in a 
sudden, unexplainable panic I started 
for the open street. But as I turned, I 
saw a man sitting on a bench, which 
the curve of the balustrade had hidden 
from me. His eyes were shut, and he 
was sleeping soundly. 

" The moment before I had been be 
wildered because I could see no one, 
but at sight of this man I was much 
more bewildered. 

" He was a very large man, a giant in 

height, with long yellow hair which 

hung below his shoulders. He was 

dressed in a red silk shirt that was 

38 



IN THE FOG 



belted at the waist and hung outside 
black velvet trousers which, in turn, 
were stuffed into high black boots. I 
recognized the costume at once as that 
of a Russian servant, but what a Rus 
sian servant in his native livery could 
be doing in a private house in Knights- 
bridge was incomprehensible. 

" I advanced and touched the man 
on the shoulder, and after an effort he 
awoke, and, on seeing me, sprang to 
his feet and began bowing rapidly and 
making deprecatory gestures. I had 
picked up enough Russian in Peters 
burg to make out that the man was 
apologizing for having fallen asleep, 
and I also was able to explain to him 
that I desired to see his master. 

"He nodded vigorously, and said, 
'Will the Excellency come this way! 
The Princess is here.' 

" I distinctly made out the word 
'princess,' and I was a good deal em- 
39 



/ N THE FOG 



barrassed. I had thought it would be 
easy enough to explain my intrusion to 
a man, but how a woman would look 
at it was another matter, and as I fol 
lowed him down the hall I was some 
what puzzled, 

"As we advanced, he noticed that 
the front door was standing open, and 
with an exclamation of surprise, has 
tened toward it and closed it. Then 
he rapped twice on the door of what 
was apparently the drawing-room. 
There was no reply to his knock, and 
he tapped again, and then timidly, and 
cringing subserviently, opened the door 
and stepped inside. He withdrew him 
self at once and stared stupidly at me, 
shaking his head. 

" ' She is not there,' he said. He 
stood for a moment gazing blankly 
through the open door, and then has 
tened toward the dining-room. The 
solitary candle which still burned there 
40 



N THE FOG 



seemed to assure him that the room 
also was empty. He came back and 
bowed me toward the drawing-room. 
' She is above,' he said ; ' I will in 
form the Princess of the Excellency's 
presence/ 

"Before I could stop him he had 
turned and was running up the stair 
case, leaving me alone at the open door 
of the drawing-room. I decided that 
the adventure had gone quite far 
enough, and if I had been able to ex 
plain to the Russian that 1 had lost 
my way in the fog, and only wanted to 
get back into the street again, I would 
have left the house on the instant. 

" Of course, when I first rang the bell 
of the house I had no other expectation 
than that it would be answered by a 
parlor-maid who would direct me on 
my way. I certainly could not then 
foresee that I would disturb a Russian 
princess in her boudoir, or that I 
41 



/ N THE FOG 



might be thrown out by her athletic 
bodyguard. Still, I thought I ought 
not now to leave the house without 
making some apology, and, if the worst 
should come, I could show my card. 
They could hardly believe that a mem 
ber of an Embassy had any designs 
upon the hat-rack. 

" The room in which I stood was 
dimly lighted, but I could see that, like 
the hall, it was hung with heavy Per 
sian rugs. The corners were filled 
with palms, and there was the unmis 
takable odor in the air of Russian cig 
arettes, and strange, dry scents that 
carried me back to the bazaars of Vladi- 
vostock. Near the front windows was 
a grand piano, and at the other end of 
the room a heavily carved screen of 
some black wood, picked out with ivory. 
The screen was overhung with a canopy 
of silken draperies, and formed a sort 
of alcove. In front of the alcove was 
42 



IN THE FOG 



spread the white skin of a polar bear, 
and set on that was one of those low 
Turkish coffee tables. It held a lighted 
spirit-lamp and two gold coffee cups. 
I had heard no movement from above 
stairs, and it must have been fully three 
minutes that I stood waiting, noting 
these details of the room and wonder 
ing at the delay, and at the strange 
silence. 

"And then, suddenly, as my eye 
grew more used to the half-light, I saw, 
projecting from behind the screen as 
though it were stretched along the back 
of a divan, the hand of a man and the 
lower part of his arm. I was as startled 
as though I had come across a footprint 
on a deserted island. Evidently the 
man had been sitting there since I had 
come into the room, even since I had 
entered the house, and he had heard 
the servant knocking upon the door. 
Why he had not declared himself I 
43 



IN THE FOG 



could not understand, but I supposed 
that possibly he was a guest, with no 
reason to interest himself in the Prin 
cess's other visitors, or perhaps, for 
some reason, he did not wish to be ob 
served. I [could see nothing of him 
except his hand, but I had an unpleas 
ant feeling that he had been peering at 
me through the carving in the screen, 
and that he still was doing so. I 
moved my feet noisily on the floor and 
said tentatively, ' I beg your pardon.' 

" There was no reply, and the hand 
did not stir. Apparently the man was 
bent upon ignoring me, but as all I 
wished was to apologize for my intru 
sion and to leave the house, I walked 
up to the alcove and peered around it. 
Inside the screen was a divan piled 
with cushions, and on the end of it 
nearer me the man was sitting. He 
was a young Englishman with light 
yellow hair and a deeply bronzed face. 
44 



IN THE FOG 



He was seated with his arms stretched 
out along the back of the divan, and 
with his head resting against a cushion. 
His attitude was one of complete ease. 
But his mouth had fallen open, and his 
eyes were set with an expression of 
utter horror. At the first glance I saw 
that he was quite dead. 

" For a flash of time I was too star 
tled to act, but in the same flash I was 
convinced that the man had met his 
death from no accident, that he had 
not died through any ordinary failure 
of the laws of nature. The expression 
on his face was much too terrible to be 
misinterpreted. It spoke as eloquently 
as words. It told me that before the 
end had come he had watched his death 
approach and threaten him. 

" I was so sure he had been murdered 
that I instinctively looked on the floor 
for the weapon, and, at the same mo 
ment, out of concern for my own 
45 



IN THE FOG 



safety, quickly behind me; but the 
silence of the house continued un 
broken. 

" I have seen a great number of dead 
men ; I was on the Asiatic Station dur 
ing the Japanese-Chinese war. I was 
in Port Arthur after the massacre. So 
a dead man, for the single reason that 
he is dead, does not repel me, and, 
though I knew that there was no hope 
that this man was alive, still for de 
cency's sake, I felt his pulse, and while 
I kept my ears alert for any sound from 
the floors above me, I pulled open his 
shirt and placed my hand upon his 
heart. My fingers instantly touched 
upon the opening of a wound, and as I 
withdrew them I found them wet with 
blood. He was in evening dress, and 
in the wide bosom of his shirt I found 
a narrow slit, so narrow that in the 
dim light it was scarcely discernable. 
The wound was no wider than the 
46 



IN THE FOG 



smallest blade of a pocket-knife, but 
when I stripped the shirt away from 
the chest and left it bare, I found that 
the weapon, narrow as it was, had been 
long enough to reach his heart. There 
is no need to tell you how I felt as I 
stood by the body of this boy, for he 
was hardly older than a boy, or of the 
thoughts that came into my head. I 
was bitterly sorry for this stranger, 
bitterly indignant at his murderer, and, 
at the same time, selfishly concerned 
for my own safety and for the notoriety 
which I saw was sure to follow. My 
instinct was to leave the body where it 
lay, and to hide myself in the fog, but 
I also felt that since a succession of 
accidents had made me the only wit 
ness to a crime, my duty was to make 
myself a good witness and to assist to 
establish the facts of this murder. 

" That it might possibly be a suicide, 
and not a murder, did not disturb 
47 



IN THE FOG 



me for a moment. The fact that the 
weapon had disappeared, and the ex 
pression on the boy's face were enough 
to convince, at least me, that he had 
had no hand in his own death. I 
judged it, therefore, of the first import 
ance to discover who was in the house, 
or, if they had escaped from it, who 
had been in the house before I entered 
it. I had seen one man leave it; but 
all I could tell of him was that he was 
a young man, that he was in evening 
dress, and that he had fled in such 
haste that he had not stopped to close 
the door behind him. 

"The Russian servant I had found 
apparently asleep, and, unless he acted 
a part with supreme skill, he was a 
stupid and ignorant boor, and as inno 
cent of the murder as myself. There 
was still the Russian princess whom he 
had expected to find, or had pretended 
to expect to find, in the same room with 
48 



IN THE FOG 



the murdered man. I judged that she 
must now be either upstairs with the 
servant, or that she had, without his 
knowledge, already fled from the house. 
When I recalled his apparently genuine 
surprise at not finding her in the draw 
ing-room, this latter supposition seemed 
the more probable. Nevertheless, I de 
cided that it was my duty to make a 
search, and after a second hurried look 
for the weapon among the cushions of 
the divan, and upon the floor, I cau 
tiously crossed the hall and entered 
the dining-room. 

"The single candle was still flicker 
ing in the draught, and showed only 
the white cloth. The rest of the room 
was draped in shadows. I picked up 
the candle, and, lifting it high above 
my head, moved around the corner of 
the table. Either my nerves were on 
such a stretch that no shock could 
strain them further, or my mind was 
* 49 



IN THE FOG 



inoculated to horrors, for I did not cry 
out at what I saw nor retreat from it. 
Immediately at my feet was the body 
of a beautiful woman, lying at full 
length upon the floor, her arms flung 
out on either side of her, and her 
white face and shoulders gleaming dully 
in the unsteady light of the candle. 
Around her throat was a great chain of 
diamonds, and the light played upon 
these and made them flash and blaze in 
tiny flames. But the woman who wore 
them was dead, and I was so certain as 
to how she had died that without an 
instant's hesitation I dropped on my 
knees beside her and placed my hands 
above her heart. My fingers again 
touched the thin slit of a wound. I 
had no doubt in my mind but that this 
was the Russian princess, and when I 
lowered the candle to her face I was 
assured that this was so. Her features 
showed the finest lines of both the Slav 
50 



IN THE FOG 



and the Jewess; the eyes were black, 
the hair blue-black and wonderfully 
heavy, and her skin, even in death, was 
rich in color. She was a surpassingly 
beautiful woman. 

" I rose and tried to light another 
candle with the one I held, but I found 
that my hand was so unsteady that I 
could not keep the wicks together. It 
was my intention to again search for 
this strange dagger which had been 
used to kill both the English boy and 
the beautiful princess, but before I 
could light the second candle I heard 
footsteps descending the stairs, and the 
Russian servant appeared in the door 
way. 

" My face was in darkness, or I am 
sure that at the sight of it he would 
have taken alarm, for at that moment 
I was not sure but that this man him 
self was the murderer. His own face 
was plainly visible to me in the light 
51 



IN THE FOG 



from the hall, and I could see that it 
wore an expression of dull bewilder 
ment. I stepped quickly toward him 
and took a firm hold upon his wrist. 

" ' She is not there,' he said. ' The 
Princess has gone. They have all 
gone.' 

'"Who have gone!' I demanded. 
' Who else has been here? ' 

" ' The two Englishmen,' he said. 

"'What two Englishmen!' I de 
manded. * What are their names! ' 

" The man now saw by my manner 
that some question of great moment 
hung upon his answer, and he began to 
protest that he did not know the names 
of the visitors and that until that even 
ing he had never seen them. 

" I guessed that it was my tone which 
frightened him, so I took my hand off 
his wrist and spoke less eagerly. 

" ' How long have they been here! ' 
I asked, l and when did they go? ' 
52 



IN THE FOG 



" He pointed behind him toward the 
drawing-room. 

" ' One sat there with the Princess,' 
he said ; ' the other came after I had 
placed the coffee in the drawing-room. 
The two Englishmen talked together 
and the Princess returned here to the 
table. She sat there in that chair, and 
I brought her cognac and cigarettes. 
Then I sat outside upon the bench. It 
was a feast day, and I had been drink 
ing. Pardon, Excellency, but I fell 
asleep. When I woke, your Excellency 
was standing by me, but the Princess 
and the two Englishmen had gone. 
That is all I know.' 

" I believed that the man was telling 
me the truth. His fright had passed, 
and he was now apparently puzzled, 
but not alarmed. 

" ' You must remember the names of 
the Englishmen,' I urged. ' Try to 
think. When you announced them to 
53 



IN THE FOG 



the Princess what name did you 
give? ' 

" At this question he exclaimed with 
pleasure, and, beckoning to me, ran 
hurriedly down the hall and into the 
drawing-room. In the corner furthest 
from the screen was the piano, and on 
it was a silver tray. He picked this up 
and, smiling with pride at his own in 
telligence, pointed at two cards that 
lay upon it. I took them up and read 
the names engraved upon them." 

The American paused abruptly, and 
glanced at the faces about him. "I 
read the names," he repeated. He 
spoke with great reluctance. 

" Continue ! ' : cried the Baronet, 
sharply. 

" I read the names," said the Amer 
ican with evident distaste, " and the 
family name of each was the same. 
They were the names of two brothers. 
One is well known to you. It is that 
54 



IN THE FOG 



of the African explorer of whom this 
gentleman was just speaking. I mean 
the Earl of Chetney. The other was 
the name of his brother, Lord Arthur 
Chetney." 

The men at the table fell back as 
though a trapdoor had fallen open at 
their feet. 

"Lord Chetney?" they exclaimed in 
chorus. They glanced at each other 
and back to the American with every 
expression of concern and disbelief. 

"It is impossible!" cried the Baro 
net. " Why, my dear sir, young Chet 
ney only arrived from Africa yesterday. 
It was so stated in the evening papers." 

The jaw of the American set in a 
resolute square, and he pressed his lips 
together. 

"You are perfectly right, sir," he 
said, " Lord Chetney did arrive in Lon 
don yesterday morning, and yesterday 
night I found his dead body." 
55 



IN THE FOG 



The youngest member present was 
the first to recover. He seemed much 
less concerned over the identity of the 
murdered man than at the interruption 
of the narrative. 

" Oh, please let him go on ! " he cried. 
"What happened then! You say you 
found two visiting cards. How do you 
know which card was that of the mur 
dered man? " 

The American, before he answered, 
waited until the chorus of exclamations 
had ceased. Then he continued as 
though he had not been interrupted. 

" The instant I read the names upon 
the cards," he said, "I ran to the screen 
and, kneeling beside the dead man, be 
gan a search through his pockets. My 
hand at once fell upon a card-case, and 
I found on all the cards it contained 
the title of the Earl of Chetney. His 
watch and cigarette-case also bore his 
name. These evidences, and the fact 
56 



IN THE FOG 



of his bronzed skin, and that his cheek 
bones were worn with fever, con 
vinced me that the dead man was the 
African explorer, and the boy who had 
fled past me in the night was Arthur, 
his younger brother. 

" I was so intent upon my search that 
I had forgotten the servant, and I was 
still on my knees when I heard a cry 
behind me. I turned, and saw the man 
gazing down at the body in abject 
horror. 

" Before I could rise, he gave another 
cry of terror, and, flinging himself into 
the hall, raced toward the door to the 
street. I leaped after him, shouting to 
him to halt, but before I could reach 
the hall he had torn open the door, and 
I saw him spring out into the yellow 
fog. I cleared the steps in a jump and 
ran down the garden walk but just as 
the gate clicked in front of me. I had 
it open on the instant, and, following 
57 



IN THE FOG 



the sound of the man's footsteps, I 
raced after him across the open street. 
He, also, could hear me, and he instantly 
stopped running, and there was absolute 
silence. He was so near that I almost 
fancied I could hear him panting, and 
I held my own breath to listen. But 
I could distinguish nothing but the 
dripping of the mist about us, and from 
far off the music of the Hungarian 
band, which I had heard when I first 
lost myself. 

"All I could see was the square of 
light from the door I had left open 
behind me, and a lamp in the hall 
beyond it nickering in the draught. 
But even as I watched it, the flame of 
the lamp was blown violently to and 
fro, and the door, caught in the same 
current of air, closed slowly. I knew 
if it shut I could not again enter the 
house, and I rushed madly toward it. 
I believe I even shouted out, as though 
58 



/ N THE F 



it were something human which I could 
compel to obey me, and then I caught 
my foot against the curb and smashed 
into the sidewalk. When I rose to my 
feet I was dizzy and half stunned, and 
though I thought then that I was mov 
ing toward the door, I know now that 
I probably turned directly from it ; for, 
as I groped about in the night, calling 
frantically for the police, my fingers 
touched nothing but the dripping fog, 
and the iron railings for which I sought 
seemed to have melted away. For 
many minutes I beat the mist with 
my arms like one at blind man's buff, 
turning sharply in circles, cursing aloud 
at my stupidity and crying continually 
for help. At last a voice answered me 
from the fog, and I found myself held 
in the circle of a policeman's lantern. 

" That is the end of my adventure. 
What I have to tell you now is what I 
learned from the police. 
59 



IN THE FOG 



"At the station-house to which the 
man guided me I related what you have 
just heard. I told them that the house 
they must at once find was one set back 
from the street within a radius of two 
hundred yards from the Knightsbridge 
Barracks, that within fifty yards of it 
some one was giving a dance to the 
music of a Hungarian band, and that 
the railings before it were as high as a 
man's waist and filed to a point. With 
that to work upon, twenty men were at 
once ordered out into the fog to search 
for the house, and Inspector Lyle him 
self was despatched to the home of Lord 
Edam, Chetney's father, with a warrant 
for Lord Arthur' s arrest. I was thanked 
and dismissed on my own recognizance. 

" This morning, Inspector Lyle called 
on me, and from him I learned the 
police theory of the scene I have just 
described. 

" Apparently I had wandered very far 
60 



IN THE FOG 



in the fog, for up to noon to-day the 
house had not been found, nor had 
they been able to arrest Lord Arthur. 
He did not return to his father's house 
last night, and there is no trace of him ; 
but from what the police knew of the 
past lives of the people I found in that 
lost house, they have evolved a theory, 
and their theory is that the murders 
were committed by Lord Arthur. 

" The infatuation of his elder brother, 
Lord Chetney, for a Russian princess, so 
Inspector Lyle tells me, is well known 
to every one. About two years ago the 
Princess Zichy, as she calls herself, 
and he were constantly together, and 
Chetney informed his friends that they 
were about to be married. The woman 
was notorious in two continents, and 
when Lord Edam heard of his son's 
infatuation he appealed to the police 
for her record. 

" It is through his having applied to 
61 



IN THE FOG 



them that they know so much concern 
ing her and her relations with the 
Chetneys. From the police Lord Edam 
learned that Madame Zichy had once 
been a spy in the employ of the Rus 
sian Third Section, but that lately she 
had been repudiated by her own gov 
ernment and was living by her wits, by 
blackmail, and by her beauty. Lord 
Edam laid this record before his son, 
but Chetney either knew it already or 
the woman persuaded him not to be 
lieve in it, and the father and son 
parted in great anger. Two days later 
the marquis altered his will, leaving all 
of his money to the younger brother, 
Arthur. 

"The title and some of the landed 
property he could not keep from Chet 
ney, but he swore if his son saw the 
woman again that the will should stand 
as it was, and he would be left without 
a penny. 

62 



IN THE FOG 



" This was about eighteen months 
ago, when apparently Chetney tired of 
the Princess, and suddenly went off to 
shoot and explore in Central Africa. 
No word came from him, except that 
twice he was reported as having died 
of fever in the jungle, and finally two 
traders reached the coast who said they 
had seen his body. This was accepted 
by all as conclusive, and young Arthur 
was recognized as the heir to the Edam 
millions. On the strength of this sup 
position he at once began to borrow 
enormous sums from the money lend 
ers. This is of great importance, as 
the police believe it was these debts 
which drove him to the murder of his 
brother. Yesterday, as you know, Lord 
Chetney suddenly returned from the 
grave, and it was the fact that for two 
years he had been considered as dead 
which lent such importance to his re 
turn and which gave rise to those col- 
63 



IN THE FOG 



umns of detail concerning him which 
appeared in all the afternoon papers. 
But, obviously, during his absence he 
had not tired of the Princess Zichy, for 
we know that a few hours after he 
reached London he sought her out. 
His brother, who had also learned of 
his reappearance through the papers, 
probably suspected which would be the 
house he would first visit, and followed 
him there, arriving, so the Russian 
servant tells us, while the two were at 
coffee in the drawing-room. The Prin 
cess, then, we also learn from the 
servant, withdrew to the dining-room, 
leaving the brothers together. What 
happened one can only guess. 

" Lord Arthur knew now that when 
it was discovered he was no longer the 
heir, the money-lenders would come 
down upon him. The police believe 
that he at once sought out his brother 
to beg for money to cover the post- 
64 



IN THE FOG 



obits, but that, considering the sum 
he needed was several hundreds of 
thousands of pounds, Chetney re 
fused to give it him. No one knew 
that Arthur had gone to seek out his 
brother. They were alone. It is pos 
sible, then, that in a passion of disap 
pointment, and crazed with the disgrace 
which he saw before him, young Arthur 
made himself the heir beyond further 
question. The death of his brother 
would have availed nothing if the 
woman remained alive. It is then pos 
sible that he crossed the hall, and with 
the same weapon which made him Lord 
Edam's heir destroyed the solitary wit 
ness to the murder. The only other 
person who could have seen it was 
sleeping in a drunken stupor, to which 
fact undoubtedly he owed his life. 
And yet," concluded the Naval Attache, 
leaning forward and marking each word 
with his finger, "Lord Arthur blun- 
s 65 



IN THE FOG 



dered fatally. In his haste he left the 
door of the house open, so giving ac 
cess to the first passer-by, and he forgot 
that when he entered it he had handed 
his card to the servant. That piece of 
paper may yet send him to the gallows. 
In the mean time he has disappeared 
completely, and somewhere, in one of 
the millions of streets of this great 
capital, in a locked and empty house, 
lies the body of his brother, and of the 
woman his brother loved, undiscovered, 
unburied, and with their murder un 
avenged." 

In the discussion which followed the 
conclusion of the story of the Naval 
Attache the gentleman with the pearl 
took no part. Instead, he arose, and, 
beckoning a servant to a far corner of 
the room, whispered earnestly to him 
until a sudden movement on the part 
of Sir Andrew caused him to return 
hurriedly to the table. 
66 



IN THE FOG 



" There are several points in Mr. 
Sears's story I want explained," he cried. 
"Be seated, Sir Andrew," he begged. 
" Let us have the opinion of an expert. 
1 do not care what the police think, I 
want to know what you think." 

But Sir Henry rose reluctantly from 
his chair. 

" I should like nothing better than to 
discuss this," he said. " But it is most 
important that I proceed to the House. 
I should have been there some time 
ago." He turned toward the servant 
and directed him to call a hansom. 

The gentleman with the pearl stud 
looked appealingly at the Naval At 
tache. " There are surely many details 
that you have not told us," he urged. 
"Some you have forgotten." 

The Baronet interrupted quickly. 

"I trust not," he said, "for I could 
not possibly stop to hear them." 

" The story is finished," declared the 
67 



IN T H E F O G 



Naval Attache ; " until Lord Arthur is 
arrested or the bodies are found there 
is nothing more to tell of either Chet- 
ney or the Princess Zichy." 

"Of Lord Chetney perhaps not," 
interrupted the sporting-looking gentle 
man with the black tie, "but there'll 
always be something to tell of the 
Princess Zichy. I know enough sto 
ries about her to fill a book. She was 
a most remarkable woman." The 
speaker dropped the end of his cigar 
into his coffee cup and, taking his case 
from his pocket, selected a fresh one. 
As he did so he laughed and held up 
the case that the others might see it. 
It was an ordinary cigar-case of well- 
worn pig-skin, with a silver clasp. 

" The only time I ever met her," he 
said, "she tried to rob me of this." 

The Baronet regarded him closely. 

" She tried to rob you? " he repeated. 

" Tried to rob me of this " continued 
68 



IN THE FOG 



the gentleman in the black tie, " and 
of the Czarina's diamonds." His tone 
was one of mingled admiration and 
injury. 

"The Czarina's diamonds ! " exclaimed 
the Baronet. He glanced quickly and 
suspiciously at the speaker, and then at 
the others about the table. But their 
faces gave evidence of no other emotion 
than that of ordinary interest. 

" Yes, the Czarina's diamonds," re 
peated the man with the black tie. 
"It was a necklace of diamonds. I 
was told to take them to the Russian 
Ambassador in Paris who was to de 
liver them at Moscow. I am a Queen's 
Messenger," he added. 

"Oh, I see," exclaimed Sir Andrew 
in a tone of relief. " And you say that 
this same Princess Zichy, one of the 
victims of this double murder, endeav 
ored to rob you of of that cigar-case." 

"And the Czarina's diamonds," an- 
69 



IN THE FOG 



swered the Queen's Messenger imper- 
turbably. "It's not much of a story, 
but it gives you an idea of the woman's 
character. The robbery took place be 
tween Paris and Marseilles." 

The Baronet interrupted him with an 
abrupt movement. " No, no," he cried, 
shaking his head in protest. " Do not 
tempt me. I really cannot listen. I 
must be at the House in ten minutes." 

" I am sorry," said the Queen's Mes 
senger. He turned to those seated 
about him. " I wonder if the other 
gentlemen " he inquired tentatively. 
There was a chorus of polite murmurs, 
and the Queen's Messenger, bowing his 
head in acknowledgment, took a pre 
paratory sip from his glass. At the 
same moment the servant to whom the 
man with the black pearl had spoken, 
slipped a piece of paper into his hand. 
He glanced at it, frowned, and threw it 
under the table. 

70 



THE FOG 



The servant bowed to the Baronet. 

"Your hansom is waiting, Sir An 
drew," he said. 

"The necklace was worth twenty 
thousand pounds," began the Queen's 
Messenger. " It was a present from 
the Queen of England to celebrate " 
The Baronet gave an exclamation of 
angry annoyance. 

"Upon my word, this is most pro 
voking," he interrupted. "I really 
ought not to stay. But I certainly 
mean to hear this." He turned irrita 
bly to the servant. " Tell the hansom 
to wait," he commanded, and, with an 
air of a boy who is playing truant, 
slipped guiltily into his chair. 

The gentleman with the black pearl 
smiled blandly, and rapped upon the 
table. 

" Order, gentlemen," he said. " Order 
for the story of the Queen's Messenger 
and the Czarina's diamonds." 
71 



CHAPTER II 

" / "T A HE necklace was a present from 
the Queen of England to the 
Czarina of Russia," began the Queen's 
Messenger. " It was to celebrate the 
occasion of the Czar's coronation. Our 
Foreign Office knew that the Russian 
Ambassador in Paris was to proceed to 
Moscow for that ceremony, and I was 
directed to go to Paris and turn over the 
necklace to him. But when I reached 
Paris I found he had not expected me for 
a week later and was taking a few days' 
vacation at Nice. His people asked me 
to leave the necklace with them at the 
Embassy, but I had been charged to 
get a receipt for it from the Ambassador 
himself, so I started at once for Nice. 
The fact that Monte Carlo is not two 
73 



THE FOG 



thousand miles from Nice may have 
had something to do with making me 
carry out my instructions so carefully. 
" Now, how the Princess Zichy came 
to find out about the necklace I don't 
know, but I can guess. As you have 
just heard, she was at one time a spy 
in the service of the Russian govern 
ment. And after they dismissed her 
she kept up her acquaintance with 
many of the Russian agents in London. 
It is probable that through one of them 
she learned that the necklace was to be 
sent to Moscow, and which one of the 
Queen's Messengers had been detailed 
to take it there. Still, I doubt if even 
that knowledge would have helped her 
if she had not also known something 
which I supposed no one else in the 
world knew but myself and one other 
man. And, curiously enough, the other 
man was a Queen's Messenger too, and 
a friend of mine. You must know that 
74 



IN THE FOG 



up to the time of this robbery I had 
always concealed my despatches in a 
manner peculiarly my own. I got the 
idea from that play called ' A Scrap of 
Paper.' In it a man wants to hide a 
certain compromising document. He 
knows that all his rooms will be se 
cretly searched for it, so he puts it in 
a torn envelope and sticks it up where 
any one can see it on his mantel shelf. 
The result is that the woman who is 
ransacking the house to find it looks in 
all the unlikely places, but passes over 
the scrap of paper that is just under 
her nose. Sometimes the papers and 
packages they give us to carry about 
Europe are of very great value, and 
sometimes they are special makes of 
cigarettes, and orders to court dress 
makers. Sometimes we know what we 
are carrying and sometimes we do not 
If it is a large sum of money or a treaty, 
they generally tell us. But, as a rule, 
75 



IN THE FOG 



we have no knowledge of what the 
package contains ; so, to be on the safe 
side, we naturally take just as great 
care of it as though we knew it held 
the terms of an ultimatum or the crown 
jewels. As a rule, my confreres carry 
the official packages in a despatch-box, 
which is just as obvious as a lady's 
jewel bag in the hands of her maid. 
Every one knows they are carrying 
something of value. They put a pre 
mium on dishonesty. Well, after I saw 
the ' Scrap of Paper ' play, I determined 
to put the government valuables in the 
most unlikely place that any one would 
look for them. So I used to hide the 
documents they gave me inside my rid 
ing-boots, and small articles, such as 
money or jewels, I carried in an old 
cigar-case. After I took to using my 
case for that purpose I bought a new 
one, exactly like it, for my cigars. But 
to avoid mistakes, I had my initials 
76 



IN THE FOG 



placed on both sides of the new one, 
and the moment I touched the case, 
even in the dark, I could tell which it 
was by the raised initials. 

" No one knew of this except the 
Queen's Messenger of whom I spoke. 
We once left Paris together on the 
Orient Express. I was going to Con 
stantinople and he was to stop off at 
Vienna. On the journey I told him of 
my peculiar way of hiding things and 
showed him my cigar-case . If I recollect 
rightly, on that trip it held the grand 
cross of St. Michael and St. George, 
which the Queen was sending to our 
Ambassador. The Messenger was very 
much entertained at my scheme, and 
some months later when he met the 
Princess he told her about it as an 
amusing story. Of course, he had no 
idea she was a Russian spy. He didn't 
know anything at all about her, except 
that she was a very attractive woman. 
77 



IN THE FOG 



It was indiscreet, but he could not pos 
sibly have guessed that she could ever 
make any use of what he told her. 

" Later, after the robbery, I remem 
bered that I had informed this young 
chap of my secret hiding-place, and 
when I saw him again I questioned him 
about it. He was greatly distressed, 
and said he had never seen the impor 
tance of the secret. He remembered 
he had told several people of it, and 
among others the Princess Zichy. In 
that way I found out that it was she 
who had robbed me, and I know that 
from the moment I left London she was 
following me and that she knew then 
that the diamonds were concealed in 
my cigar-case. 

" My train for Nice left Paris at ten 
in the morning. When I travel at 
night I generally tell the chef de gare 
that I am a Queen's Messenger, and he 
gives me a compartment to myself, 
78 



IN THE FOG 



but in the daytime I take whatever 
offers. On this morning I had found 
an empty compartment, and I had 
tipped the guard to keep every one else 
out, not from any fear of losing the 
diamonds, but because I wanted to 
smoke. He had locked the door, and 
as the last bell had rung I supposed I 
was to travel alone, so I began to ar 
range my traps and make myself com 
fortable. The diamonds in the cigar- 
case were in the inside pocket of my 
waistcoat, and as they made a bulky 
package, I took them out, intending to 
put them in my hand bag. It is a small 
satchel like a bookmaker's, or those 
hand bags that couriers carry. I wear 
it slung from a strap across my shoul 
der, and, no matter whether I am sit 
ting or walking, it never leaves me. 

" I took the cigar-case which held the 
necklace from my inside pocket and 
the case which held the cigars out of 
79 



IN THE FOG 



the satchel, and while I was searching 
through it for a box of matches I laid 
the two cases beside me on the seat. 

"At that moment the train started, 
but at the same instant there was a 
rattle at the lock of the compartment, 
and a couple of porters lifted and 
shoved a woman through the door, and 
hurled her rugs and umbrellas in after 
her. 

" Instinctively I reached for the dia 
monds. I shoved them quickly into 
the satchel and, pushing them far down 
to the bottom of the bag, snapped the 
spring lock. Then I put the cigars in 
the pocket of my coat, but with the 
thought that now that I had a woman 
as a travelling companion I would prob 
ably not be allowed to enjoy them. 

"One of her pieces of luggage had 

fallen at my feet, and a roll of rugs had 

landed at my side. I thought if I hid 

the fact that the lady was not welcome. 

80 



IN T H E F G 



and at once endeavored to be civil, she 
might permit me to smoke. So I picked 
her hand bag off the floor and asked her 
where I might place it. 

" As I spoke I looked at her for the 
first time, and saw that she was a most 
remarkably handsome woman. 

" She smiled charmingly and begged 
me not to disturb myself. Then she 
arranged her own things about her, and, 
opening her dressing-bag, took out a 
gold cigarette case. 

" ' Do you object to smoke? ' she 
asked. 

"I laughed and assured her I had 
been in great terror lest she might ob 
ject to it herself. 

" ' If you like cigarettes,' she said, 
* will you try some of these? They are 
rolled especially for my husband in 
Russia, and they are supposed to be 
very good.' 

" I thanked her, and took one from 
81 



IN THE FOG 



her case, and I found it so much better 
than my own that I continued to 
smoke her cigarettes throughout the 
rest of the journey. I must say that 
we got on very well. I judged from 
the coronet on her cigarette-case, and 
from her manner, which was quite as 
well bred as that of any woman I ever 
met, that she was some one of impor 
tance, and though she seemed almost 
too good looking to be respectable, I 
determined that she was some grande 
dame who was so assured of her posi 
tion that she could afford to be uncon 
ventional. At first she read her novel, 
and then she made some comment on 
the scenery, and finally we began to 
discuss the current politics of the Con 
tinent. She talked of all the cities in 
Europe, and seemed to know every one 
worth knowing. But she volunteered 
nothing about herself except that she 
frequently made use of the expression, 
82 



IN THE FOG 



'When my husband was stationed at 
Vienna,' or 'When my husband was 
promoted to Rome.' Once she said to 
me, * I have often seen you at Monte 
Carlo. I saw you when you won the 
pigeon championship.' I told her that 
I was not a pigeon shot, and she gave a 
little start of surprise. ' Oh, I beg your 
pardon,' she said; ' I thought you were 
Morton Hamilton, the English cham 
pion.' As a matter of fact, I do look 
like Hamilton, but I know now -that 
her object was to make me think that 
she had no idea as to who I really was. 
She need n't have acted at all, for I cer 
tainly had no suspicions of her, and 
was only too pleased to have so charm 
ing a companion. 

"The one thing that should have 
made me suspicious was the fact that 
at every station she made some trivial 
excuse to get me out of the compart 
ment. She pretended that her maid 
83 



IN THE FOG 



was travelling back of us in one 
of the second-class carriages, and kept 
saying she could not imagine why 

the woman did not come to look after 

* 

her, and if the maid did not turn up 
at the next stop, would I be so very 
kind as to get out and bring her 
whatever it was she pretended she 
wanted. 

" I had taken my dressing-case from 
the rack to get out a novel, and had left 
it on the seat opposite to mine, and at 
the end of the compartment farthest 
from her. And once when I came back 
from buying her a "cup of chocolate, or 
from some other fool errand, I found 
her standing at my end of the compart 
ment with both hands on the dressing- 
bag. She looked at me without so 
much as winking an eye, and shoved 
the case carefully into a corner. ' Your 

bag slipped off on the floor,' she said. 
84 



/ N THE FOG 



1 If you Ve got any bottles in it, you 
had better look and see that they're 
not broken.' 

"And I give you my word, I was 
such an ass that I did open the case 
and looked all through it. She must 
have thought I was a Juggins. I get 
hot all over whenever I remember it. 
But in spite of my dulness, and her 
cleverness, she could n't gain anything 
by sending me away, because what she 
wanted was in the hand bag and every 
time she sent me away the hand bag 
went with me. 

; "After the incident of the dressing- 
case her manner changed. Either in 
my absence she had had time to look 
through it, or, when I was examining 
it for broken bottles, she had seen every 
thing it held. 

" From that moment she must have 
been certain that the cigar-case, in 
which she knew I carried the diamonds, 
85 



/ N THE FOG 



was in the bag that was fastened to my 
body, and from that time on she prob 
ably was plotting how to get it from me. 
" Her anxiety became most apparent. 
She dropped the great lady manner, 
and her charming condescension went 
with it. She ceased talking, and, when 
I spoke, answered me irritably, or at 
random. No doubt her mind was en 
tirely occupied with her plan. The 
end of our journey was drawing rapidly 
nearer, and her time for action was 
being cut down with the speed of the 
express train. Even I, unsuspicious 
as I was, noticed that something was 
very wrong with her. I really believe 
that before we reached Marseilles if I 
had not, through my own stupidity, 
given her the chance she wanted, she 
might have stuck a knife in me and 
rolled me out on the rails. But as it 
was, I only thought that the long jour 
ney had tired her. I suggested that it 
86 



/ N THE FOG 



was a very trying trip, and asked her 
if she would allow me to offer her some 
of my cognac. 

" She thanked me and said, * No,' and 
then suddenly her eyes lighted, and 
she exclaimed, ' Yes, thank you, if you 
will be so kind.' 

" My flask was in the hand bag, and 
I placed it on my lap and with my 
thumb slipped back the catch. As I 
keep my tickets and railroad guide in 
the bag, I am so constantly opening it 
that I never bother to lock it, and the 
fact that it is strapped to me has always 
been sufficient protection. But I can 
appreciate now what a satisfaction, and 
what a torment too, it must have been 
to that woman when she saw that the 
bag opened without a key. 

" While we were crossing the moun 
tains I had felt rather chilly and had 
been wearing a light racing coat. But 
after the lamps were lighted the com- 
87 



IN THE FOG 



partment became very hot and stuffy, 
and I found the coat uncomfortable. 
So I stood up, and, after first slipping 
the strap of the bag over my head, I 
placed the bag in the seat next me and 
pulled off the racing coat. I don't 
blame myself for being careless; the 
bag was still within reach of my hand, 
and nothing would have happened if at 
that exact moment the train had not 
stopped at Aries. It was the combina 
tion of my removing the bag and our 
entering the station at the same instant 
which gave the Princess Zichy the 
chance she wanted to rob me. 

"I needn't say that she was clever 
enough to take it. The train ran into 
the station at full speed and came to a 
sudden stop. I had just thrown my 
coat into the rack, and had reached 
out my hand for the bag. In another 
instant I would have had the strap 
around my shoulder. But at that 
88 



IN THE FOG 



moment the Princess threw open the 
door of the compartment and beckoned 
wildly at the people on the platform. 
* Natalie ! ' she called, ' Natalie ! here 
I am. Come here ! This way ! ' She 
turned upon me in the greatest excite 
ment. t My maid ! ' she cried. ' She is 
looking for me. She passed the win 
dow without seeing me. Go, please, 
and bring her back.' She continued 
pointing out of the door and beckoning 
me with her other hand. There cer 
tainly was something about that 
woman's tone which made one jump. 
When she was giving orders you had 
no chance to think of anything else. 
So I rushed out on my errand of mercy, 
and then rushed back again to ask what 
the maid looked like. 

" ' In black,' she answered, rising and 
blocking the door of the compartment. 
' All in black, with a bonnet ! ' 

" The train waited three minutes at 
89 



/ N THE FOG 



Aries, and in that time I suppose I 
must have rushed up to over twenty 
women and asked, ' Are you Natalie? ' 
The only reason I wasn't punched 
with an umbrella or handed over to the 
police was that they probably thought 
I was crazy. 

" When I jumped back into the com 
partment the Princess was seated where 
I had left her, but her eyes were burn 
ing with happiness. She placed her 
hand on my arm almost affectionately, 
and said in a hysterical way, * You are 
very kind to me. I am so sorry to 
have troubled you.' 

"I protested that every woman on 
the platform was dressed in black. 

"'Indeed I am so sorry,' she said, 
laughing; and she continued to laugh 
until she began to breathe so quickly 
that I thought she was going to faint, 

" I can see now that the last part of 
that journey must have been a terrible 
90 



/ N THE FOG 



half hour for her. She had the cigar- 
case safe enough, but she knew that 
she herself was not safe. She under 
stood if I were to open my bag, even 
at the last minute, and miss the case, I 
would know positively that she had 
taken it. I had placed the diamonds 
in the bag at the very moment she en 
tered the compartment, and no one but 
our two selves had occupied it since. 
She knew that when we reached Mar 
seilles she would either be twenty thou 
sand pounds richer than when she left 
Paris, or that she would go to jail. 
That was the situation as she must 
have read it, and I don't envy her her 
state of mind during that last half hour. 
It must have been hell. 

" I saw that something was wrong, 
and in my innocence I even wondered 
if possibly my cognac had not been a 
little too strong. For she suddenly 
developed into a most brilliant conver- 
91 



IN THE FOG 



sationalist, and applauded and laughed 
at everything I said, and fired off ques 
tions at me like a machine gun, so that 
I had no time to think of anything but 
of what she was saying. Whenever I 
stirred she stopped her chattering and 
leaned toward me, and watched me like 
a cat over a mouse-hole. I wondered 
how I could have considered her an 
agreeable travelling companion. I 
thought I would have preferred to be 
locked in with a lunatic. I don't like 
to think how she would have acted if I 
had made a move to examine the bag, 
but as I had it safely strapped around 
me again, I did not open it, and I 
reached Marseilles alive. As we drew 
into the station she shook hands with 
me and grinned at me like a Cheshire 
cat. 

" * I cannot tell you/ she said, ' how 
much I have to thank you for.' What 
do you think of that for impudence! 
92 



/ N THE FOG 



" I offered to put her in a carriage, but 
she said she must find Natalie, and that 
she hoped we would meet again at the 
hotel. So I drove off by myself, won 
dering who she was, and whether Nat 
alie was not her keeper. 

" I had to wait several hours for the 
train to Nice, and as I wanted to stroll 
around the city I thought I had better 
put the diamonds in the safe of the 
hotel. As soon as I reached my room 
I locked the door, placed the hand bag 
on the table and opened it. I felt 
among the things at the top of it, but 
failed to touch the cigar-case. I shoved 
my hand in deeper, and stirred the 
things about, but still I did not reach 
it. A cold wave swept down my spine, 
and a sort of emptiness came to the pit 
of my stomach. Then I turned red-hot, 
and the sweat sprung out all over me. 
I wet my lips with my tongue, and said 
to myself, ' Don't be an ass. Pull your- 
93 



IN THE FOG 



self together, pull yourself together. 
Take the things out, one at a time. 
It 's there, of course it 's there. Don't 
be an ass.' 

" So I put a brake on my nerves and 
began very carefully to pick out the 
things one by one, but after another 
second I could not stand it, and I 
rushed across the room and threw 
out everything on the bed. But the 
diamonds were not among them. I 
pulled the things about and tore them 
open and shuffled and rearranged and 
sorted them, but it was no use. The 
cigar-case was gone. I threw every 
thing in the dressing-case out on the 
floor, although I knew it was useless to 
look for it there. I knew that I had 
put it in the bag. I sat down and tried 
to think. I remembered I had put it 
in the satchel at Paris just as that 
woman had entered the compartment, 
and I had been alone with her ever 
94 




-1 rushed across the room and threw out everything on the bed." 



IN THE FOG 



since, so it was she who had robbed 
me. But how ? It had never left my 
shoulder. And then I remembered that 
it had that I had taken it off when 
I had changed my coat and for the few 
moments that I was searching for Nata 
lie. I remembered that the woman had 
sent me on that goose chase, and that 
at every other station she had tried to 
get rid of me on some fool errand. 

" I gave a roar like a mad bull, and I 
jumped down the stairs six steps at a 
time. 

" I demanded at the office if a distin 
guished lady of title, possibly a Rus 
sian, had just entered the hotel. 

"As I expected, she had not. I 
sprang into a cab and inquired at two 
other hotels, and then I saw the folly 
of trying to catch her without outside 
help, and I ordered the fellow to gallop 
to the office of the Chief of Police. I 
told my story, and the ass in charge 
95 



/ N THE FOG 



asked me to calm myself, and wanted to 
take notes. I told him this was no 
time for taking notes, but for doing 
something. He got wrathy at that, and 
I demanded to be taken at once to his 
Chief. The Chief, he said, was very 
busy, and could not see me. So I 
showed him my silver greyhound. In 
eleven years I had never used it but 
once before. I stated in pretty vigor 
ous language that I was a Queen's 
Messenger, and that if the Chief of 
Police did not see me instantly he 
would lose his official head. At that 
the fellow jumped off his high horse 
and ran with me to his Chief, a smart 
young chap, a colonel in the army, and 
a very intelligent man. 

" I explained that I had been robbed 
in a French railway carriage of a dia 
mond necklace belonging to the Queen 
of England, which her Majesty was 
sending as a present to the Czarina of 
96 



IN THE FOG 



Russia. I pointed out to him that if 
he succeeded in capturing the thief he 
would be made for life, and would 
receive the gratitude of three great 
powers. 

" He was n't the sort that thinks 
second thoughts are best. He saw 
Russian and French decorations sprout 
ing all over his chest, and he hit a bell, 
and pressed buttons, and yelled out 
orders like the captain of a penny 
steamer in a fog. He sent her descrip 
tion to all the city gates, and ordered 
all cabmen and railway porters to 
search all trains leaving Marseilles. 
He ordered all passengers on outgoing 
vessels to be examined, and telegraphed 
the proprietors of every hotel and pen 
sion to send him a complete list of 
their guests within the hour. While I 
was standing there he must have given 
at least a hundred orders, and sent out 
enough commissaires, sergeants de ville, 
97 



IN THE FOG 



gendarmes, bicycle police, and plain- 
clothes Johnnies to have captured the 
entire Grerman army. When they had 
gone he assured me that the woman 
was as good as arrested already. In 
deed, officially, she was arrested; for 
she had no more chance of escape from 
Marseilles than from the Chateau D'If. 

" He told me to return to my hotel 
and possess my soul in peace. Within 
an hour he assured me he would ac 
quaint me of her arrest. 

" I thanked him, and complimented 
him on his energy, and left him. But 
I did n't share in his confidence. I felt 
that she was a very clever woman, and 
a match for any and all of us. It was 
all very well for him to be jubilant. 
He had not lost the diamonds, and had 
everything to gain if he found them; 
while I, even if he did recover the 
necklace, would only be where I was 
before I lost them, and if he did not 
98 



IN THE FOG 



recover it I was a ruined man. It was 
an awful facer for me. I had always 
prided myself on my record. In eleven 
years I had never mislaid an envelope, 
nor missed taking the first train. And 
now I had failed in the most important 
mission that had ever been intrusted to 
me. And it wasn't a thing that could 
be hushed up, either. It was too con 
spicuous, too spectacular. It was sure 
to invite the widest notoriety. I saw 
myself ridiculed all over the Continent, 
and perhaps dismissed, even suspected 
of having taken the thing myself. 

" I was walking in front of a lighted 
cafe*, and I felt so sick and miserable 
that I stopped for a pick-me-up. Then 
I considered that if I took one drink I 
would probably, in my present state of 
mind, not want to stop under twenty, 
and I decided I had better leave it 
alone. But my nerves were jumping 
like a frightened rabbit, and I felt I 
99 



must have something to quiet them, or 
I would go crazy. I reached for my 
cigarette-case, but a cigarette seemed 
hardly adequate, so I put it back again 
and took out this cigar-case, in which I 
keep only the strongest and blackest 
cigars. I opened it and stuck in my 
fingers, but instead of a cigar they 
touched on a thin leather envelope. 
My heart stood perfectly still. I did 
not dare to look, but I dug my finger 
nails into the leather and I felt layers 
of thin paper, then a layer of cotton, 
and then they scratched on the facets 
of the Czarina's diamonds! 

"I stumbled as though I had been 
hit in the face, and fell back into one 
of the chairs on the sidewalk. I tore 
off the wrappings and spread out the 
diamonds on the caf6 table; I could 
not believe they were real. I twisted 
the necklace between my fingers and 
crushed it between my palms and 
100 



THE FOG 



tossed it up in the air. I believe I 
almost kissed it. The women in the 
cafe stood up on the chairs to see bet 
ter, and laughed and screamed, and the 
people crowded so close around me 
that the waiters had to form a body 
guard. The proprietor thought there 
was a fight, and called for the police. 
I was so happy I did n't care. I 
laughed, too, and gave the proprietor a 
five-pound note, and told him to stand 
every one a drink. Then I tumbled 
into a fiacre and galloped off to my 
friend the Chief of Police. I felt very 
sorry for him. He had been so happy 
at the chance I gave him, and he 
was sure to be disappointed when he 
learned I had sent him off on a false 
alarm. 

" But now that I had found the 
necklace, I did not want him to find 
the woman. Indeed, I was most anx 
ious that she should get clear away, 
101 



IN T H E F G 



for if she were caught the truth would 
come out, and I was likely to get 
a sharp reprimand, and sure to be 
laughed at. 

" I could see now how it had hap 
pened. In my haste to hide the dia 
monds when the woman was hustled 
into the carriage, I had shoved the 
cigars into the satchel, and the dia 
monds into the pocket of my coat. 
Now that I had the diamonds safe again, 
it seemed a very natural mistake. But 
I doubted if the Foreign Office would 
think so. I was afraid it might not 
appreciate the beautiful simplicity of 
my secret hiding-place. So, when I 
reached the police station, and found 
that the woman was still at large, I 
was more than relieved. 

" As I expected, the Chief was ex 
tremely chagrined when he learned of 
my mistake, and that there was nothing 
for him to do. But I was feeling so 
102 



IN THE FOG 



happy myself that I hated to have any 
one else miserable, so I suggested that 
this attempt to steal the Czarina's 
necklace might be only the first of a 
series of such attempts by an unscru 
pulous gang, and that I might still be 
in danger. 

" I winked at the Chief and the Chief 
smiled at me, and we went to Nice 
together in a saloon car with a guard 
of twelve carabineers and twelve plain- 
clothes men, and the Chief and I drank 
champagne all the way. We marched 
together up to the hotel where the Rus 
sian Ambassador was stopping, closely 
surrounded by our escort of carabi 
neers, and delivered the necklace with 
the most profound ceremony. The old 
Ambassador was immensely impressed, 
and when we hinted that already I had 
been made the object of an attack by 
robbers, he assured us that his Imperial 
Majesty would not prove ungrateful. 
103 



IN THE FOG 



" I wrote a swinging personal letter 
about the invaluable services of the 
Chief to the French Minister of Foreign 
Affairs, and they gave him enough 
Russian and French medals to satisfy 
even a French soldier. So, though he 
never caught the woman, he received 
his just reward." 

The Queen's Messenger paused and 
surveyed the faces of those about him 
in some embarrassment. 

"But the worst of it is," he added, 
" that the story must have got about ; 
for, while the Princess obtained noth 
ing from me but a cigar-case and five 
excellent cigars, a few weeks after the 
coronation the Czar sent me a gold 
cigar-case with his monogram in dia 
monds. And I don't know yet whether 
that was a coincidence, or whether the 
Czar wanted me to know that he knew 
that I had been carrying the Czarina's 
diamonds in my pigskin cigar-case. 
What do you fellows think? " 
104 



CHAPTER III 

CIR ANDREW rose with disapproval 
written in every lineament. 

" I thought your story would bear 
upon the murder," he said. " Had I 
imagined it would have nothing what 
soever to do with it I would not have 
remained." He pushed back his chair 
and bowed stiffly. "I wish you good 
night," he said. 

There was a chorus of remonstrance, 
and under cover of this and the Baro 
net's answering protests a servant for 
the second time slipped a piece of 
paper into the hand of the gentleman 
with the pearl stud. He read the lines 
written upon it and tore it into tiny 
fragments. 

The youngest member, who had re- 
105 



IN THE FOG 



mained an interested but silent listener 
to the tale of the Queen's Messenger, 
raised his hand commandingly. 

" Sir Andrew," he cried, " in justice 
to Lord Arthur Chetney I must ask 
you to be seated. He has been accused 
in our hearing of a most serious 
crime, and I insist that you remain 
until you have heard me clear his 
character." 

" You ! " cried the Baronet. 

"Yes," answered the young man 
briskly. " I would have spoken sooner," 
he explained, " but that I thought this 
gentleman " he inclined his head 
toward the Queen's Messenger "was 
about to contribute some facts of which 
I was ignorant. He, however, has told 
us nothing, and so I will take up the 
tale at the point where Lieutenant 
Sears laid it down and give you those 
details of which Lieutenant Sears is 
ignorant. It seems strange to you that 
106 



IN THE FOG 



I should be able to add the sequel 
to this story. But the coincidence is 
easily explained. I am the junior mem 
ber of the law firm of Chudleigh & 
Chudleigh. We have been solicitors 
for the Chetneys for the last two 
hundred years. Nothing, no matter 
how unimportant, which concerns Lord 
Edam and his two sons is unknown to 
us, and naturally we are acquainted 
with every detail of the terrible catas 
trophe of last night." 

The Baronet, bewildered but eager, 
sank back into his chair. 

" Will you be long, sir?" he de 
manded. 

"I shall endeavor to be brief," said 
the young solicitor; "and," he added, 
in a tone which gave his words almost 
the weight of a threat, " I promise to 
be interesting." 

" There is no need to promise that," 
said Sir Andrew, " I find it much too 
107 



IN THE FOG 



interesting as it is." He glanced rue 
fully at the clock and turned his eyes 
quickly from it. 

" Tell the driver of that hansom," he 
called to the servant, " that I take him 
by the hour." 

"For the last three days," began 
young Mr. Chudleigh, " as you have 
probably read in the daily papers, the 
Marquis of Edam has been at the point 
of death, and his physicians have never 
left his house. Every hour he seemed 
to grow weaker; but although his 
bodily strength is apparently leaving 
him forever, his mind has remained clear 
and active. Late yesterday evening 
word was received at our office that he 
wished my father to come at once to 
Chetney House and to bring with him 
certain papers. What these papers were 
is not essential ; I mention them only 
to explain how it was that last night I 
happened to be at Lord Edam's bed- 
108 



IN THE FOG 



side. I accompanied my father to 
Chetney House, but at the time we 
reached there Lord Edam was sleeping, 
and his physicians refused to have him 
awakened. My father urged that he 
should be allowed to receive Lord 
Edam's instructions concerning the 
documents, but the physicians would 
not disturb him, and we all gathered 
in the library to wait until he should 
awake of his own accord. It was about 
one o'clock in the morning, while we 
were still there, that Inspector Lyle 
and the officers from Scotland Yard 
came to arrest Lord Arthur on the 
charge of murdering his brother. You 
can imagine our dismay and distress. 
Like every one else, I had learned from 
the afternoon papers that Lord Chet 
ney was not dead, but that he had re 
turned to England, and on arriving at 
Chetney House I had been told that 



109 



IN THE FOG 



Hotel to look for his brother and to 
inform him that if he wished to see 
their father alive he must come to him 
at once. Although it was now past 
one o'clock, Arthur had not returned. 
None of us knew where Madame Zichy 
lived, so we could not go to recover 
Lord Chetney's body. We spent a most 
miserable night, hastening to the win 
dow whenever a cab came into the 
square, in the hope that it was Arthur 
returning, and endeavoring to explain 
away the facts that pointed to him as 
the murderer. I am a friend of Ar 
thur's, I was with him at Harrow and 
at Oxford, and I refused to believe for 
an instant that he was capable of such 
a crime; but as a lawyer I could not 
help but see that the circumstantial 
evidence was strongly against him. 

" Toward early morning Lord Edam 
awoke, and in so much better a state of 
health that he refused to make the 
110 



1 N THE FOG 



changes in the papers which he had 
intended, declaring that he was no 
nearer death than ourselves. Under 
other circumstances, this happy change 
in him would have relieved us greatly, 
but none of us could think of any 
thing save the death of his elder son 
and of the charge which hung over 
Arthur. 

" As long as Inspector Lyle remained 
in the house my father decided that I, 
as one of the legal advisers of the fam 
ily, should also remain there. But 
there was little for either of us to do. 
Arthur did not return, and nothing oc 
curred until late this morning, when 
Lyle received word that the Russian 
servant had been arrested. He at once 
drove to Scotland Yard to question 
him. He came back to us in an hour, 
and informed me that the servant had 
refused to tell anything of what had 
happened the night before, or of him- 
111 



IN THE FOG 

self, or of the Princess Zichy. He 
would not even give them the address 
of her house. 

" ' He is in abject terror,' Lyle said. 
' I assured him that he was not sus 
pected of the crime, but he would tell 
me nothing.' 

" There were no other developments 
until two o'clock this afternoon, when 
word was brought to us that Arthur had 
been found, and that he was lying in the 
accident ward of St. Greorge's Hospital. 
Lyle and I drove there together, and 
found him propped up in bed with his 
head bound in a bandage. He had 
been brought to the hospital the night 
before by the driver of a hansom that 
had run over him in the fog. The cab- 
hoi?se had kicked him on the head, and 
he had been carried in unconscious. 
There was nothing on him to tell who 
he was, and it was not until he came 
to his senses this afternoon that the 
112 



IN THE FOG 



hospital authorities had been able to 
send word to his people. Lyle at once 
informed him that he was under arrest, 
and with what he was charged, and 
though the inspector warned him to 
say nothing which might be used 
against him, I, as his solicitor, in 
structed him to speak freely and to tell 
us all he knew of the occurrences of 
last night. It was evident to any one 
that the fact of his brother's death was 
of much greater concern to him, than 
that he was accused of his murder. 

" ' That,' Arthur said contemptuously, 
' that is damned nonsense. It is mon 
strous and cruel. We parted better 
friends than we have been in years. I 
will tell you all that happened not 
to clear myself, but to help you to find 
out the truth.' His story is as follows: 
Yesterday afternoon, owing to his con 
stant attendance on his father, he did 
not look at the evening papers, and it 
8 113 



IN THE FOG 



was not until after dinner, when the 
butler brought him one and told him of 
its contents, that he learned that his 
brother was alive and at the Bath 
Hotel. He drove there at once, but was 
told that about eight o'clock his brother 
had gone out, but without giving any 
clew to his destination. As Chetney 
had not at once come to see his father, 
Arthur decided that he was still angry 
with him, and his mind, turning natu 
rally to the cause of their quarrel, 
determined him to look for Chetney at 
the home of the Princess Zichy. 

" Her house had been pointed out to 
him, and though he had never visited 
it, he had passed it many times and 
knew its exact location. He accord 
ingly drove in that direction, as far as 
the fog would permit the hansom to 
go, and walked the rest of the way, 
reaching the house about nine o'clock. 
He rang, and was admitted by the Rus- 
114 



IN THE FOG 

sian servant. The man took his card 
into the drawing-room, and at once his 
brother ran out and welcomed him. 
He was followed by the Princess Zichy, 
who also received Arthur most cor 
dially. 

" * You brothers will have much to 
talk about,' she said. 1 1 am going to 
the dining-room. When you have fin 
ished, let me know.' 

" As soon as she had left them, Ar 
thur told his brother that their father 
was not expected to outlive the night, 
and that he must come to him at once. 

" * This is not the moment to remem 
ber your quarrel,' Arthur said to him ; 
1 you have come back from the dead 
only in time to make your peace with 
him before he dies.' 

"Arthur says that at this Chetney 
was greatly moved. 

" 'You entirely misunderstand me, Ar 
thur,' he returned. ' I did not know the 
115 



IN THE FOG 



governor was ill, or I would have gone 
to him the instant I arrived. My only 
reason for not doing so was because I 
thought he was still angry with me. I 
shall return with you immediately, as 
soon as I have said good-by to the Prin 
cess. It is a final good-by. After to 
night, I shall never see her again.' 

" ' Do you mean that? ' Arthur cried. 

" ' Yes,' Chetney answered. ' When 
I returned to London I had no inten 
tion of seeking her again, and I am 
here only through a mistake.' He then 
told Arthur that he had separated from 
the Princess even before he went to 
Central Africa, and that, moreover, 
while at Cairo on his way south, he had 
learned certain facts concerning her 
life there during the previous season, 
which made it impossible for him to 
ever wish to see her again. Their sep 
aration was final and complete. 

" ' She deceived me cruelly,' he said; 
116 



'I cannot tell you how cruelly. Dur 
ing the two years when I was trying to 
obtain my father's consent to our mar 
riage she was in love with a Russian 
diplomat. During all that time he was 
secretly visiting her here in London, 
and her trip to Cairo was only an 
excuse to meet him there.' 

" ' Yet you are here with her to 
night,' Arthur protested, 'only a few 
hours after your return.' 

" ' That is easily explained,' Chetney 
answered. ' As I finished dinner to 
night at the hotel, I received a note 
from her from this address. In it she 
said she had but just learned of my ar 
rival, and begged me to come to her at 
once. She wrote that she was in great 
and present trouble, dying of an incu 
rable illness, and without friends or 
money. She begged me, for the sake 
of old times, to come to her assistance. 
During the last two years in the jungle 
117 



J A THE FOG 



all my former feeling for Zichy has 
utterly passed away, but no one could 
have dismissed the appeal she made in 
that letter. So I came here, and found 
her, as you have seen her, quite as 
beautiful as she ever was, in very good 
health, and, from the look of the house, 
in no need of money. 

" ' I asked her what she meant by 
writing me that she was dying in a 
garret, and she laughed, and said she 
had done so because she was afraid, 
unless I thought she needed help, I 
would not try to see her. That was 
where we were when you arrived. 
And now/ Chetney added, ' I will say 
good-by to her, and you had better re 
turn home. No, you can trust me, I 
shall follow you at once. She has no 
influence over me now, but I believe, 
in spite of the way she has used me, 
that she is, after her queer fashion, still 
fond of me, and when she learns that 
118 



IN T H E F O G 



this good-by is final there may be a 
scene, and it is not fair to her that you 
should be here. So, go home at once, 
and tell the governor that I am follow 
ing you in ten minutes. ' 

" ' That,' said Arthur, ' is the way we 
parted. I never left him on more 
friendly terms. I was happy to see 
him alive again, I was happy to think 
he had returned in time to make up 
his quarrel with my father, and I was 
happy that at last he was shut of that 
woman. I was never better pleased 
with him in my life.' He turned to 
Inspector Lyle, who was sitting at the 
foot of the bed taking notes of all he 
told us. 

" ' Why in the name of common 
sense,' he cried, ' should I have chosen 
that moment of all others to send my 
brother back to the grave? ' For a mo 
ment the Inspector did not answer him. 
I do not know if any of you gentlemen 
119 



IN THE FOG 



are acquainted with Inspector Lyle, but 
if you are not, I can assure you that he 
is a very remarkable man. Our firm 
often applies to him for aid, and he 
has never failed us; my father has 
the greatest possible respect for him. 
Where he has the advantage over the 
ordinary police official is in the fact 
that he possesses imagination. He im 
agines himself to be the criminal, im 
agines how he would act under the same 
circumstances, and he imagines to such 
purpose that he generally finds the 
man he wants. I have often told Lyle 
that if he had not been a detective he 
would have made a great success as a 
poet, or a playwright. 

" When Arthur turned on him Lyle 
hesitated for a moment, and then told 
him exactly what was the case against 
him. 

" ' Ever since your brother was re 
ported as having died in Africa,' he 
120 



IN THE FOG 



said, 'your Lordship has been collect 
ing money on post orbits. Lord Chet- 
ney's arrival last night turned them 
into waste paper. You were suddenly 
in debt for thousands of pounds for 
much more than you could ever possibly 
pay. No one knew that you and your 
brother had met at Madame Zichy's. 
But you knew that your father was not 
expected to outlive the night, and that 
if your brother were dead also, you 
would be saved from complete ruin, 
and that you would become the Mar 
quis of Edam.' 

" ' Oh, that is how you have worked 
it out, is it? ' Arthur cried. 'And for 
me to become Lord Edam was it neces 
sary that the woman should die, too? ' 

" ' They will say,' Lyle answered, 
' that she was a witness to the murder 
that she would have told.' 

" ' Then why did I not kill the ser 
vant as well? ' Arthur said. 
121 



IN THE FOG 



" ' He was asleep, and saw nothing.' 

" ' And you believe thatf ' Arthur de 
manded. 

" ' It is not a question of what I be 
lieve,' Lyle said gravely. ' It is a ques 
tion for your peers.' 

" ' The man is insolent ! ' Arthur 
cried. ' The thing is monstrous ! Hor 
rible!' 

" Before we could stop him he sprang 
out of his cot and began pulling on his 
clothes. When the nurses tried to hold 
him down, he fought with them. 

" ' Do you think you can keep me 
here/ he shouted, ' when they are plot 
ting to hang me! I am going with you 
to that house! ' he cried at Lyle. 
' When you find those bodies I shall be 
beside you. It is my right. He is my 
brother. He has been murdered, and 
I can tell you who murdered him. 
That woman murdered him. She first 
ruined his life, and now she has killed 
122 



IN THE FOG 



him. For the last five years she has 
been plotting to make herself his wife, 
and last night, when he told her he 
had discovered the truth about the 
Russian, and that she would never see 
him again, she flew into a passion and 
stabbed him, and then, in terror of the 
gallows, killed herself. She murdered 
him, I tell you, and I promise you that 
we will find the knife she used near 
her perhaps still in her hand. What 
will you say to that! ' 

" Lyle turned his head away and 
stared down at the floor. ' I might 
say,' he answered, 'that you placed it 
there.' 

"Arthur gave a cry of anger and 
sprang at him, and then pitched for 
ward into his arms. The blood was 
running from the cut under the band 
age, and he had fainted. Lyle carried 
him back to the bed again, and we left 
him with the police and the doctors, 
123 



IN THE FOG 



and drove at once to the address he 
had given us. We found the house not 
three minutes' walk from St. George's 
Hospital. It stands in Trevor Terrace, 
that little row of houses set back from 
Knightsbridge, with one end in Hill 
Street. 

"As we left the hospital Lyle had 
said to me, * You must not blame 
me for treating him as I did. All is 
fair in this work, and if by angering 
that boy I could have made him com 
mit himself I was right in trying to do 
so ; though, I assure you, no one would 
be better pleased than myself if I could 
prove his theory to be correct. But we 
cannot tell. Everything depends upon 
what we see for ourselves within the 
next few minutes.' 

" When we reached the house, Lyle 

broke open the fastenings of one of the 

windows on the ground floor, and, 

hidden by the trees in the garden, we 

124 



IN THE FOG 



scrambled in. We found ourselves in 
the reception-room, which was the first 
room on the right of the hall. The gas 
was still burning behind the coloured 
glass and red silk shades, and when the 
daylight streamed in after us it gave 
the hall a hideously dissipated look, 
like the foyer of a theatre at a matinee, 
or the entrance to an all-day gambling 
hell. The house was oppressively si 
lent, and because we knew why it was 
so silent we spoke in whispers. When 
Lyle turned the handle of the drawing- 
room door, I felt as though some one 
had put his hand upon my throat. 
But I followed close at his shoulder, 
and saw, in the subdued light of many- 
tinted lamps, the body of Chetney at 
the foot of the divan, just as Lieutenant 
Sears had described it. In the draw 
ing-room we found the body of the 
Princess Zichy, her arms thrown out, 
and the blood from her heart frozen in 
125 



IN THE FOG 



a tiny line across her bare shoulder. 
But neither of us, although we searched 
the floor on our hands and knees, could 
find the weapon which had killed her. 

" * For Arthur's sake,' I said, ' I would 
have given a thousand pounds if we 
had found the knife in her hand, as he 
said we would.' 

" ' That we have not found it there,' 
Lyle answered, ' is to my mind the 
strongest proof that he is telling the 
truth, that he left the house before 
the murder took place. He is not a 
fool, and had he stabbed his brother 
and this woman, he would have seen 
that by placing the knife near her he 
could help to make it appear as if she 
had killed Chetney and then committed 
suicide. Besides, Lord Arthur insisted 
that the evidence in his behalf would 
be our finding the knife here. He 
would not have urged that if he knew 
we would not find it, if he knew he 
126 



IN THE FOG 



himself had carried it away. This is 
no suicide. A suicide does not rise 
and hide the weapon with which he 
kills himself, and then lie down again. 
No, this has been a double murder, and 
we must look outside of the house for 
the murderer.' 

" While he was speaking Lyle and I 
had been searching every corner, study 
ing the details of each room. I was so 
afraid that, without telling me, he 
would make some deductions prejudi 
cial to Arthur, that I never left his 
side. I was determined to see every 
thing that he saw, and, if possible, to 
prevent his interpreting it in the wrong 
way. He finally finished his examina 
tion, and we sat down together in the 
drawing-room, and he took out his 
notebook and read aloud all that Mr. 
Sears had told him of the murder and 
what we had just learned from Arthur. 
We compared the two accounts word 
127 



1 N THE FOG 



for word, and weighed statement with 
statement, but I could not determine 
from anything Lyle said which of the 
two versions he had decided to believe. 

" ' We are trying to build a house of 
blocks,' he exclaimed, 'with half of 
the blocks missing. We have been 
considering two theories,' he went on: 
* one that Lord Arthur is responsible 
for both murders, and the other that 
the dead woman in there is responsible 
for one of them, and has committed 
suicide ; but, until the Russian servant 
is ready to talk, I shall refuse to believe 
in the guilt of either.' 

" ' What can you prove by him! ' I 
asked. 'He was drunk and asleep. 
He saw nothing.' 

" Lyle hesitated, and then, as though 
he had made up his mind to be quite 
frank with me, spoke freely. 

" ' I do not know that he was either 
drunk or asleep,' he answered. ' Lieu- 
128 



IN THE FOG 



tenant Sears describes him as a stupid 
boor. I am not satisfied that he is not 
a clever actor. What was his position 
in this house? What was his real duty 
here? Suppose it was not to guard 
this woman, but to watch her. Let us 
imagine that it was not the woman he 
served, but a master, and see where 
that leads us. For this house has a 
master, a mysterious, absentee land 
lord, who lives in St. Petersburg, the 
unknown Russian who came between 
Chetney and Zichy, and because of 
whom Chetney left her. He is the 
man who bought this house for Madame 
Zichy, who sent these rugs and curtains 
from St. Petersburg to furnish it for her 
after his own tastes, and, I believe, it 
was he also who placed the Russian 
servant here, ostensibly to serve the 
Princess, but in reality to spy upon 
her. At Scotland Yard we do not 
know who this gentleman is ; the Rus- 
129 



IN THE FOG 



sian police confess to equal ignorance 
concerning him. When Lord Chetney 
went to Africa, Madame Zichy lived in 
St. Petersburg; but there her recep 
tions and dinners were so crowded 
with members of the nobility and of 
the army and diplomats, that among so 
many visitors the police could not learn 
which was the one for whom she most 
greatly cared.' 

" Lyle pointed at the modern French 
paintings and the heavy silk rugs which 
hung upon the walls. 

" ' The unknown is a man of taste and 
of some fortune,' he said, ' not the sort 
of man to send a stupid peasant to 
guard the woman he loves. So I am 
not content to believe, with Mr. Sears, 
that the servant is a boor. I believe 
him instead to be a very clever ruffian. 
I believe him to be the protector of his 
master's honor, or, let us say, of his mas 
ter's property, whether that property 
130 



IN THE FOG 



be silver plate or the woman his master 
loves. Last night, after Lord Arthur 
had gone away, the servant was left 
alone in this house with Lord Chetney 
and Madame Zichy. From where he 
sat in the hall he could hear Lord 
Chetney bidding her farewell; for, if 
my idea of him is correct, he under 
stands English quite as well as you or 
I. Let us imagine that he heard her 
entreating Chetney not to leave her, 
reminding him of his former wish to 
marry her, and let us suppose that he 
hears Chetney denounce her, and tell 
her that at Cairo he has learned of this 
Russian admirer the servant's mas 
ter. He hears the woman declare that 
she has had no admirer but himself, 
that this unknown Russian was, and 
is, nothing to her, that there is no man 
she loves but him, and that she cannot 
live, knowing that he is alive, without 
his love. Suppose Chetney believed 
131 



IN THE FOG 



her, suppose his former infatuation for 
her returned, and that in a moment of 
weakness he forgave her and took her 
in his arms. That is the moment the 
Russian master has feared. It is to 
guard against it that he has placed his 
watchdog over the Princess, and how 
do we know but that, when the mo 
ment came, the watchdog served his 
master, as he saw his duty, and killed 
them both? What do you think?' 
Lyle demanded. 'Would not that ex 
plain both murders'? ' 

" I was only too willing to hear any 
theory which pointed to any one else 
as the criminal than Arthur, but Lyle's 
explanation was too utterly fantastic. 
I told him that he certainly showed 
imagination, but that he could not 
hang a man for what he imagined he 
had done. 

" ' No,' Lyle answered, ' but I can 
frighten him by telling him what I 
132 



IN THE FOG 



think he has done, and now when I 
again question the Russian servant 
I will make it quite clear to him that I 
believe he is the , murderer. I think 
that will open his mouth. A man will 
at least talk to defend himself. Come,' 
he said, 'we must return at once to 
Scotland Yard and see him. There is 
nothing more to do here.' 

" He arose, and I followed him into 
the hall, and in another minute we 
would have been on our way to Scot 
land Yard. But just as he opened the 
street door a postman halted at the 
gate of the garden, and began fumbling 
with the latch. 

" Lyle stopped, with an exclamation 
of chagrin. 

" ' How stupid of me ! ' he exclaimed. 
He turned quickly and pointed to a 
narrow slit cut in the brass plate of the 
front door. ' The house has a private 
letter-box,' he said, ' and I had not 
133 



IN THE FOG 



thought to look in it ! If we had gone 
out 'as we came in, by the window, I 
would never have seen it. The mo 
ment I entered the house I should have 
thought of securing the letters which 
came this morning. I have been grossly 
careless.' He stepped back into the 
hall and pulled at the lid of the letter 
box, which hung on the inside of the 
door, but it was tightly locked. At the 
same moment the postman came up 
the steps holding a letter. Without a 
word Lyle took it from his hand and 
began to examine it. It was addressed 
to the Princess Zichy, and on the back 
of the envelope was the name of a 
West End dressmaker. 

"'That is of no use to me,' Lyle 
said. He took out his card and showed 
it to the postman. ' I am Inspector 
Lyle from Scotland Yard,' he said. 
' The people in this house are under 
arrest. Everything it contains is now 
134 



IN THE FOG 



in my keeping. Did you deliver any 
other letters here this morning? ' 

" The man looked frightened, but 
answered promptly that he was now 
upon his third round. He had made 
one postal delivery at seven that morn 
ing and another at eleven. 

" l How many letters did you leave 
here! ' Lyle asked. 

"'About six altogether,' the man 
answered. 

" ' Did you put them through the 
door into the letter-box? ' 

" The postman said, l Yes, I always 
slip them into the box, and ring and go 
away. The servants collect them from 
the inside.' 

" t Have you noticed if any of the 
letters you leave here bear a Russian 
postage stamp! ' Lyle asked. 

" The man answered, l Oh, yes, sir, 
a great many.' 

" ' From the same person, would you 
say!' 

135 



IN THE FOG 



" ' The writing seems to be the same,' 
the man answered. ' They come reg 
ularly about once a week one of 
those I delivered this morning had a 
Russian postmark.' 

" ' That will do,' said Lyle eagerly. 
* Thank you, thank you very much.' 

"He ran back into the hall, and, 
pulling out his penknife, began to pick 
at the lock of the letter-box. 

"'I have been supremely careless,' 
he said in great excitement. ' Twice 
before when people I wanted had flown 
from a house I have been able to fol 
low them by putting a guard over their 
mail-box. These letters, which arrive 
regularly every week from Russia in 
the same handwriting, they can come 
but from one person. At least, we shall 
now know the name of the master of 
this house. Undoubtedly it is one of 
his letters that the man placed here 
this morning. We may make a most 
important discovery.' 
136 



IN THE FOG 



"As he was talking he was picking 
at the lock with his knife, but he was 
so impatient to reach the letters that 
he pressed too heavily on the blade and 
it broke in his hand. I took a step 
backward and drove my heel into the 
lock, and burst it open. The lid flew 
back, and we pressed forward, and 
each ran his hand down into the letter 
box. For a moment we were both too 
startled to move. The box was empty. 

" I do not know how long we stood 
staring stupidly at each other, but it 
was Lyle who was the first to recover. 
He seized me by the arm and pointed 
excitedly into the empty box. 

"'Do you appreciate what that 
means?' he cried. 'It means that 
some one has been here ahead of us. 
Some one has entered this house not 
three hours before we came, since 
eleven o'clock this morning.' 

" ' It was the Russian servant ! ' I ex 
claimed. 

137 



IN THE FOG 



" ' The Russian servant has been 
under arrest at Scotland Yard,' Lyle 
cried. ' He could not have taken the 
letters. Lord Arthur has been in his 
cot at the hospital. That is his alibi. 
There is some one else, some one we 
do not suspect, and that some one is 
the murderer. He came back here 
either to obtain those letters because 
he knew they would convict him, or to 
remove something he had left here at 
the time of the murder, something in 
criminating, the weapon, perhaps, or 
some personal article ; a cigarette-case, 
a handkerchief with his name upon it, 
or a pair of gloves. Whatever it was 
it must have been damning evidence 
against him to have made him take so 
desperate a chance.' 

"'How do we know,' I whispered, 
* that he is not hidden here now! ' 

" ' No, I '11 swear he is not,' Lyle 
answered. ' I may have bungled in 
138 



IN THE FOG 



some things, but I have searched this 
house thoroughly. Nevertheless,' he 
added, ' we must go over it again, from 
the cellar to the roof. We have the 
real clew now, and we must forget the 
others and work only it.' As he spoke 
he began again to search the drawing- 
room, turning over even the books on 
the tables and the music on the piano. 
" ' Whoever the man is,' he said over 
his shoulder, ' we know that he has 
a key to the front door and a key to 
the letter-box. That shows us he is 
either an inmate of the house or that 
he comes here when he wishes. The 
Russian says that he was the only ser 
vant in the house. Certainly we have 
found no evidence to show that any 
other servant slept here. There could 
be but one other person who would 
possess a key to the house and the 
letter-box and he lives in St. Peters 
burg. At the time of the murder he 
139 



IN THE FOG 



was two thousand miles away.' Lyle 
interrupted himself suddenly with a 
sharp cry and turned upon me with his 
eyes flashing. ' But was he? ' he cried. 
'Was he? How do we know that last 
night he was not in London, in this 
very house when Zichy and Chetney 
met?' 

" He stood staring at me without see 
ing me, muttering, and arguing with 
himself. 

" ' Don't speak to me,' he cried, as I 
ventured to interrupt him. * I can see 
it now. It is all plain. It was not the 
servant, but his master, the Russian 
himself, and it was he who came back 
for the letters! He came back for 
them because he knew they would con 
vict him. We must find them. We 
must have those letters. If we find 
the one with the Russian postmark, we 
shall have found the murderer.' He 
spoke like a madman, and as he spoke 
140 



1 N THE FOG 



he ran around the room with one hand 
held out in front of him as you have 
seen a mind-reader at a theatre seeking 
for something hidden in the stalls. He 
pulled the old letters from the writing- 
desk, and ran them over as swiftly as a 
gambler deals out cards; he dropped 
on his knees before the fireplace and 
dragged out the dead coals with his 
bare fingers, and then with a low, wor 
ried cry, like a hound on a scent, he 
ran back to the waste-paper basket and, 
lifting the papers from it, shook them 
out upon the floor. Instantly he gave 
a shout of triumph, and, separating a 
number of torn pieces from the others, 
held them up before me. 

"'Look!' he cried. 'Do you see? 
Here are five letters, torn across in two 
places. The Russian did not stop to 
read them, for, as you see, he has left 
them still sealed. I have been wrong. 
He did not return for the letters. He 
141 



IN THE FOG 



could not have known their value. He 
must have returned for some other 
reason, and, as he was leaving, saw 
the letter-box, and taking out the let 
ters, held them together so and 
tore them twice across, and then, as 
the fire had gone out, tossed them into 
this basket. Look ! ' he cried, ' here in 
the upper corner of this piece is a 
Eussian stamp. This is his own letter 
unopened ! ' 

"We examined the Russian stamp 
and found it had been cancelled in St. 
Petersburg four days ago. The back 
of the envelope bore the postmark of 
the branch station in upper Sloane 
Street, and was dated this morning. 
The envelope was of official blue paper 
and we had no difficulty in finding the 
two other parts of it. We drew the 
torn pieces of the letter from them 
and joined them together side by side. 
There were but two lines of writing, 
142 



IN THE FOG 



and this was the message: 'I leave 
Petersburg on the night train, and I 
shall see you at Trevor Terrace after 
dinner Monday evening.' 

" ' That was last night ! ' Lyle cried. 
' He arrived twelve hours ahead of his 
letter but it came in time it came 
in time to hang him ! ' 

The Baronet struck the table with 
his hand. 

" The name ! " he demanded. " How 
was it signed? What was the man's 
name?" 

The young Solicitor rose to his feet 
and, leaning forward, stretched out his 
arm. " There was no name," he cried. 
" The letter was signed with only two 
initials. But engraved at the top of 
the sheet was the man's address. That 
address was 'THE AMERICAN EMBASSY, 
ST. PETERSBURG, BUREAU OF THE NAVAL 
ATTACHE,' and the initials," he shouted, 
his voice rising into an exultant and 
143 



IN THE FOG 



bitter cry, " were those of the gentle 
man who sits opposite who told us that 
he was the first to find the murdered 
bodies, the Naval Attache to Russia, 
Lieutenant Sears! ' 

A strained and awful hush followed 
the Solicitor's words, which seemed to 
vibrate like a twanging bowstring that 
had just hurled its bolt. Sir Andrew, 
pale and staring, drew away with an 
exclamation of repulsion. His eyes 
were fastened upon the Naval Attache* 
with fascinated horror. But the Amer 
ican emitted a sigh of great content, 
and sank comfortably into the arms 
of his chair. He clapped his hands 
softly together. 

" Capital ! " he murmured. " I give 
you my word I never guessed what you 
were driving at. You fooled me, I'll 
be hanged if you did n't you certainly 
fooled me." 

The man with the pearl stud leaned 
144 



IN THE FOG 



forward with a nervous gesture. 
" Hush ! be careful ! " he whispered. 
But at that instant, for the third time, 
a servant, hastening through the room, 
handed him a piece of paper which he 
scanned eagerly. The message on the 
paper read, " The light over the Com 
mons is out. The House has risen." 

The man with the black pearl gave a 
mighty shout, and tossed the paper 
from him upon the table. 

"Hurrah! " he cried. "The House 
is up ! We 've won ! ' He caught up 
his glass, and slapped the Naval At 
tache violently upon the shoulder. He 
nodded joyously at him, at the So 
licitor, and at the Queen's Messenger. 
" Gentlemen, to you! " he cried; " my 
thanks and my congratulations ! ' He 
drank deep from the glass, and 
breathed forth a long sigh of satisfac 
tion and relief. 

"But I say," protested the Queen's 
145 



IN THE FOG 



Messenger, shaking his finger violently 
at the Solicitor, " that story won't do. 
You did n't play fair and and you 
talked so fast I could n't make out what 
it was all about. I '11 bet you that 
evidence wouldn't hold in a court of 
law you could n't hang a cat on such 
evidence. Ypur story is condemned 
tommy-rot. Now my story might have 
happened, my story bore the mark " 

In the joy of creation the story-tellers 
had forgotten their audience, until a 
sudden exclamation from Sir Andrew 
caused them to turn guiltily toward 
him. His face was knit with lines of 
anger, doubt, and amazement. 

" What does this mean! " he cried. 
"Is this a jest, or are you mad? If 
you know this man is a murderer, why 
is he at large? Is this a game you 
have been playing? Explain your 
selves at once. What does it mean? " 

The American, with first a glance 
146 



IN THE FOG 



at the others, rose and bowed cour 
teously. 

" I am not a murderer, Sir Andrew, 
believe me," he said; " you need not be 
alarmed. As a matter of fact, at this 
moment I am much more afraid of you 
than you could possibly be of me. I 
beg you please to be indulgent. I as 
sure you, we meant no disrespect. We 
have been matching stories, that is all, 
pretending that we are people we are 
not, endeavoring to entertain you with 
better detective tales than, for instance, 
the last one you read, ' The Great Rand 
Robbery.'" 

The Baronet brushed his hand ner 
vously across his forehead. 

"Do you mean to tell me," he ex 
claimed, "that none of this has hap 
pened! That Lord Chetney is not dead, 
that his Solicitor did not find a letter of 
yours written from your post in Peters 
burg, and that just now, when he charged 
you with murder, he was in jest! ' 
147 



IN THE FOG 



"I am really very sorry," said the 
American, " but you see, sir, he could 
not have found a letter written by me 
in St. Petersburg because I have never 
been in Petersburg. Until this week, 
I have never been outside of my own 
country. I am not a naval officer. I 
am a writer of short stories. And to 
night, when this gentleman told me 
that you were fond of detective stories, 
I thought it would be amusing to tell 
you one of my own one I had just 
mapped out this afternoon." 

" But Lord Chetney is a real person," 
interrupted the Baronet, " and he did 
go to Africa two years ago, and he was 
supposed to have died there, and his 
brother, Lord Arthur, has been the 
heir. And yesterday Chetney did re 
turn. I read it in the papers." 

"So did I," assented the American 
soothingly; " and it struck me as being 
a very good plot for a story. I mean 
148 



1 N THE FOG 



his unexpected return from the dead, 
and the probable disappointment of the 
younger brother. So I decided that the 
younger brother had better murder the 
older one. The Princess Zichy I in 
vented out of a clear sky. The fog 
I did not have to invent. Since last 
night I know all that there is to know 
about a London fog. I was lost in one 
for three hours." 

The Baronet turned grimly upon the 
Queen's Messenger. 

"But this gentleman," he protested, 
" he is not a writer of short stories ; he 
is a member of the Foreign Office. I 
have often seen him in Whitehall, and, 
according to him, the Princess Zichy is 
not an invention. He says she is very 
well known, that she tried to rob him." 

The servant of the Foreign Office 
looked unhappily at the Cabinet Minis 
ter, and puffed nervously on his cigar. 

"It 's true, Sir Andrew, that I am a 
149 



N THE FOG 



Queen's Messenger," he said appeal- 
ingly, " and a Russian woman once did 
try to rob a Queen's Messenger in a rail 
way carriage only it did not happen 
to me, but to a pal of mine. The only 
Russian princess I ever knew called 
herself Zabrisky. You may have seen 
her. She used to do a dive from the 
roof of the Aquarium." 

Sir Andrew, with a snort of indigna 
tion, fronted the young Solicitor. 

" And I suppose yours was a cock- 
and-bull story, too," he said. " Of 
course, it must have been, since Lord 
Chetney is not dead. But don't tell 
me," he protested, "that you are not 
Chudleigh's son either." 

"I'm sorry," said the youngest 
member, smiling in some embarrass 
ment, " but my name is not Chudleigh. 
I assure you, though, that I know the 
family very well, and that I am on very 
good terms with them." 
150 



THE FOG 



" You should be ! ' exclaimed the 
Baronet; "and, judging from the lib 
erties you take with the Chetneys, you 
had better be on very good terms with 
them, too." 

The young man leaned back and 
glanced toward the servants at the far 
end of the room. 

"It has been so long since I have 
been in the Club," he said, " that I 
doubt if even the waiters remember 
me. Perhaps Joseph may," he added. 
"Joseph! " he called, and at the word 
a servant stepped briskly forward. 

The young man pointed to the stuffed 
head of a great lion which was sus 
pended above the fireplace. 

" Joseph," he said, " I want you to 
tell these gentlemen who shot that 
lion. Who presented it to the Grill? " 

Joseph, unused to acting as master 
of ceremonies to members of the Club, 
shifted nervously from one foot to the 
other. 

151 



1 N THE FOG 



"Why, you you did," lie stam 
mered. 

" Of course I did ! ' ' exclaimed the 
young man. "I mean, what is the 
name of the man who shot it? Tell the 
gentlemen who I am. They would n't 
believe me." 

"Who you are, my lord?" said Jo 
seph. " You are Lord Edam's son, the 
Earl of Chetney." 

"You must admit," said Lord Chet 
ney, when the noise had died away, 
" that I could n't remain dead while my 
little brother was accused of murder. 
I had to do something. Family pride 
demanded it. Now, Arthur, as the 
younger brother, can't afford to be 
squeamish, but personally I should hate 
to have a brother of mine hanged for 
murder." 

"You certainly showed no scruples 
against hanging me," said the Ameri 
can, " but in the face of your evidence I 
152 



7 N THE FOG 



admit my guilt, and I sentence myself 
to pay the full penalty of the law as we 
are made to pay it in my own country. 
The order of this court is," he an 
nounced, " that Joseph shall bring me 
a wine-card, and that I sign it for five 
bottles of the Club's best champagne." 
" Oh, no! " protested the man with 
the pearl stud, "it is not for you to 
sign it. In my opinion it is Sir An 
drew who should pay the costs. It is 
time you knew," he said, turning to 
that gentleman, "that unconsciously 
you have been the victim of what I 
may call a patriotic conspiracy. These 
stories have had a more serious pur 
pose than merely to amuse. They 
have been told with the worthy object 
of detaining you from the House of 
Commons. I must explain to you, that 
all through this evening I have had a 
servant waiting in Trafalgar Square 
with instructions to bring me word as 
153 



IN THE FOG 



soon as the light over the House of 
Commons had ceased to burn. The 
light is now out, and the object for 
which we plotted is attained." 

The Baronet glanced keenly at the 
man with the black pearl, and then 
quickly at his watch. The smile dis 
appeared from his lips, and his face 
was set in stern and forbidding lines. 

"And may I know," he asked icily, 
" what was the object of your plot? ' 

" A most worthy one," the other re 
torted. " Our object was to keep you 
from advocating the expenditure of 
many millions of the people's money 
upon more battleships. In a word, we 
have been working together to prevent 
you from passing the Navy Increase 
Bill." 

Sir Andrew's face bloomed with bril 
liant color. His body shook with sup 
pressed emotion. 

" My dear sir ! ' he cried, ' ' you 
154 




" What was the object of your plot? " 



IN THE F O Q 



should spend more time at the House 
and less at your Club. The Navy Bill 
was brought up on its third reading at 
eight o'clock this evening. I spoke for 
three hours in its favor. My only 
reason for wishing to return again to 
the House to-night was to sup on the 
terrace with my old friend, Admiral 
Simons; for my work at the House 
was completed five hours ago, when 
the Navy Increase Bill was passed by 
an overwhelming majority." 

The Baronet rose and bowed. " I 
have to thank you, sir," he said, " for a 
most interesting evening." 

The American shoved the wine-card 
which Joseph had given him toward 
the gentleman with the black pearl. 

"You sign it," he said. 



GI7ILDFOKD I 
BILLING AMD SONS, LTD., PRINTERS 



A LIST OF 



MR. HEINEMANN'S 
PUBLICATIONS 



Telegrams: 
Sunlocks, London 

Telephone 
2279 Gerrard 



London 

21 Bedford Street 
Strand, W.C. 
March 1002 



THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE 
OF SPORTS AND PASTIMES 

EDITED BY 

ALFRED E. T. WATSON 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY PRICE ONE SHILLING NET 

ALSO IN HALF-YEARLY VOLUMES 

Volumes I. 1895. II. and III., 1896. IV. and V., 1897. 

VI. and VII., 1898. VIII. and IX., 1899. X* and XL, 1900. 

6s. each. 

Volumes XII. and XIIL, 1901. js. 6d. each net. 

FOUR COLOURED ILLUSTRATIONS ARE NOW GIVEN 

IN EACH PART, IN ADDITION TO THE USUAL 

BLACK-AND-WHITE ILLUSTRATIONS 



THE 

NORTH AMERICAN REVIEW 

EDITED BY 

GEORGE B. M. HARVEY 

PUBLISHED MONTHLY 
PRICE TWO SHILLINGS AND SIXPENCE 



MR. HEINEMANN'S 
CATALOGUE 

3T 3fR. HEINEMANIf will send, any bound book in this list 
on approval on receipt of the title of the work required and the 
name of the nearest bookseller through whom it may be sent. 

Hrt, Hrcbeoloot &c. 

SIR HENRY RAEBURN. By SIR WALTER ARMSTRONG, 

Director of the National Gallery, Ireland. With an Introduction by 
R. A. M. STEVENSON, and a Biographical and Descriptive Catalogue by 
J. L. CAW, Curator of the National Portrait Gallery of Scotland. With 
68 Plates, 66 in Photogravure and 2 in Lithographic fac-simile. Imp. 410, 
5 5*. net. 



CHARACTERS OF ROMANCE. By WILLIAM NICHOLSON. 

A portfolio of 16 prints in Colours of characters famous in fiction. 
i. DON QUIXOTE ; 2. Miss FOTHERINGAY AND CAPTAIN COSTIGAN ; 
3. MR. TONY WELLER; 4. MR. ROCHESTER 15. MADGK WILDFIRE; 6. MR. 
JORROCKS ; 7. CHICOT ; 8. COMMODORE TRUNNION : 9. VANSLYPERKEN ; 
10. MULVANEY ; ii. GARGANTUA ; 12. JOHN SILVER ; 13. SOPHIA WES 
TERN ; 14. BARON MUNCHAUSKN ; 15. Miss HAVISHAM ; 16. PORTHOS. 
2 2S. net. 
* These are obtainable separately, framed, price los. 6d. each net. 

PORTRAITS. By WILLIAM NICHOLSON. Mounted for framing, 

15 in. by i6J in. Price 2$. 6rf. each net. 

HER LATE MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA. His MAJESTY THE KING. 

THE ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY. SARAH BERNHARDT. 

CECIL RHODES. LORD ROBERTS. 

JAMES McNuiLL WHISTLER. PRINCE BISMARCK. 

SIR HENRY IRVING. W. E. GLADSTONE. 

RUDYARD KIPLING. SIR HENRY HAWKINS. 

%* The above 12 portraits may be had in a portfolio, price zis. net. A few 
sets of the Plates have been taken from the Original Wood-block, and Hand- 
coloured by the Artist. Price 21 net. 

LORD KITCHENER. THE KAISER. 

A NEW PORTRAIT OF LORD ROBERTS. By WILLIAM 

NICHOLSON. Size 20 X 15 in. Price 5$. net. 

THE SQUARE BOOK OF ANIMALS. By WILLIAM 
NICHOLSON. With Rhymes by ARTHUR WAUGH. The Popular Edition, 
lithographed on Cartridge-paper. 410 boards. Price 5^. 
Also a limited edition, on Japanese vellum. Price its. 6d. net. 

LONDON TYPES. By WILLIAM NICHOLSON. Twelve 

Coloured Plates, each illustrating a type. With Quatorzains by W. E. 
HENLEY. 410, boards. Lithographed on Cartridge Paper. Price 5*. 
%* A few sets of the Plates, printed from the Original ll r ooti-blocks, and 
Hand-coloured by the Artist, in Portfolio. Price Twenty Guineas net. 



MR. PI EIN EM ANN'S LIST. 



AN ALMANAC OF TWELVE SPORTS. By WILLIAM 

NICHOLSON. Twelve Coloured Plates, each illustrating a sport for the 
month. With accompanying Rhymes by RUDYARD KIPLING. 410, boards. 
Lithographed on Cartridge Paper. Price zs. 6ii. 

*** A few sets of the Plates, printed from the Original Wnodblocks and 
Hand-coloured by the Artist, in Portfolio. Price Twenty Guineas net. 

AN ALPHABET. By WILLIAM NICHOLSON. Twenty-six 

Coloured Plates, each illustrating a letter of the alphabet. 410, boards. 
Lithographed on Cartridge Paper. Price 5^. 

The Library Edition (Limited). Li'hographed in Colours on Dutch Hand 
made Paper, mounted on brown paper and bound in cloth, Gilt Edges. 
Price i2S. 6d, net. 

*** A few sets of the Plates, printed from the Original Woodblocks and 
Hand-coloured by the Artist, in Portfolio. Price 21 net. 

BRITISH CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS. Critical 

Studies of WATTS, MILLAIS, ALMA-TADEMA, BURNE-JONES, ORCHARD- 
SON, LEIGHTON, and POYNTER. By COSMO MONKHOUSE. Cheap re 
issue. In One Volume, Royal 8vo. Illustrated. Price los. net. 

RUBENS. His Life, his Work, and his Time. By EMILE 

MICHEL. Translated by ELIZABETH LEE. With 40 Coloured Plates, 

40 Photogravures and 872 Text Illustrations. In Two Volumes, Imperial 
8vo, 2 2S. net. 

LEONARDO DA VINCI. Arti=t, Thinker, and Man of 
Science. From the French of EUGENE MONTZ, Member of the Insti 
tute of France, &c. With 48 Plates and 252 Text Illustrations. In Two 
Volumes. Price 2 2S. net. 

ANTONIO ALLEGRI DA CORREGGIO: His Life, his 

Friends, and his Time By CORRAPO RICCI, Director of the Royal 
Ga'lery, Parma. Translated by FLORENCE SIMMONDS. With 16 Photo 
gravure Plates, 21 full-page Plates in Tint, and 190 Illustrations in the 
Text Imperial 8vo, 2 2s. net. 

REMBRANDT : His Life, his Work, and his Time. By EMILE 
MICHEL, Member of the Institute of France. Translated by FLORENCE 
SIMMONDS. Edited and Prefaced by FREDERICK WEDMORE. Second 
Edition, Enlarged, with 76 full-page Plates, and 250 Illustrations in the 
Text. In One Volume, gilt top, or in Two Volumes, imperial 8vo, 
2 2s. net. 
** A few copies of the EDITION DE LUXE of the First Edition, printed on. 

Japanese vellum with India proof duplicates of the photogravures, are still on 

sale, price 12 i2S. net. 

REMBRANDT. Seventeen of his Masterpieces from the collec 
tion of his Pictures in the Cassel Gallery. Reproduced in Photogravure 
by the Berlin Photographic Company. With an Essay by FREDERICK 
WEDMORE. In large portfolio 27^ inches x 20 inches. 

The first twenty-five impressions of each plate are numbered and signed, 
and of these only fourteen are for sale in England at the net price of Twenty 
Guineas the set. The price of the impressions after the first twenty-five is 
Twelve Guineas net, per set. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



A HISTORY OF DANCING: From the Earliest Ajjes to 
Our Own Times. From the French of GASTON VIULLIER. With 24 
Plates in Photogravure and 409 Illustrations in the Text. In One 
Volume, 410. Price, cloth, 36^. net, or Vellum, gilt top, SOT. net. 

%* Also 35 copies printed on Japanese vellum (containing 3 additional 
Plates], with a duplicate set of the Plates on India paper for framing. Each 
copy numbered and signed, price ,12 12$. net. 

ROMAN ART. Some of its principles and their application to 
Early Christian Painting. By FRANZ WICK HOP F. Translated and 
edited by MRS. S. ARTHUR STRONG, LL.D. With 14 plates and 
numerous text Illustrations. i i6f. net. 

MASTERPIECES OF GREEK SCULPTURE. A Series 
or Essays on the History of Art. By ADOLF FURTWANGLER. Authorised 
Tianslation. Edited by EUGENIE SELLERS. With 19 full-page and 200 
text Illustrations. Imperial 8vo, 3 3-r. net. 

** Also an EDITION DE LUXE on Japanese I'ellum, limited to 50 numbered 
copies, in Two Volumes, price 12 i2s. net. 

POMPEI: The City, its Life and Art. By PIERRE GUSMAN. 
Translated by FLORENCE SIMMONDS and M. JOURDAIN. With 500 text 
Illustrations, and 12 coloured plates from drawings by the Author 
Imperial 8vo, i iGs. net. 

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF MR. BADMAN. Pre- 

sented to the world in a familiar dialogue between MR. WISEMAN and 
MR. ATTENTIVE. By JOHN BUNYAN, Author of "The Pilgrim's Pro 
gress." With Twelve Compositions by GEORGE WOOLLISCROFT RHEAD 
and Louis RHEAD designed to portray the deadly sins of the ungodly. 
Mr. Badman's journey from this world to Hell. One Volume quarto on 
Imitation hand-made paper. Price 151. net. 

%* Also a limited edition on Dutch Handmade Paper at i us. 6</. net. 

BEAUTY AND ART. By AI.DAM H EATON. Crown 8vo, 

c'oih, 6s. 

CATALOGUE OF THE EXHIBITION OF INTER 
NATIONAL ART, KNIGHTSBRIDGE, 1898. THE INTER. 
NATIONAL SOCIETY OF SCULPTORS, PAINTERS AND 
GRAVERS, ILLUSTRATED SOUVENIR. In One Volume, 4 to, 
boards. W ith 108 Reproductions fi ora the works exhibited (including 3 
Photogravures). Price 31-. dd. net. 

A CATALOGUE OF THE ACCADEMIA DELLE 

BELLE ARTI AT VENICE. With Biographical Notices of the 
Painters and Reproductions of some of their Works. Edited by E. M. 
KEARV. Crown 8vo, cloth, 2S. dct. net; paper, is. net. 

A CATALOGUE OF THE MUSEO DEL PRADO AT 

MADRID. Con. piled by E. LAWSON. Crown 8vo, cloth, 3^. net ; paper, 
2j. 6d. net. 

ANIMAL SYMBOLISM IN ECCLESIASTICAL 
ARCHITECTURE. By E. P. EVANS. With a Bibliography and 
Seventy-eight Illustrations, irown 8vo, 9*. 

A 2 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



ano Correspondence. 

THE VERSAILLES HISTORICAL SERIES. 

A Series of Memoirs, Correspondence, and Letters of Noted 
Persons belonging to the different European Courts, giving 
Graphic Descriptions of Court Life, State Secrets, and the 
Private Sayings and Doings of Royalty and Court Attaches. 
Translated and arranged by KATHERINE PRESCOTT WORME- 
LEY. Illustrated with numerous Photogravures. In Eighteen 
Vols., demy 8vo. 

MEMOIRS OF MADAME DE MOTTEVILLE ON 
ANNE OF AUSTRIA AND HER COURT. With an Introduction 
by C. A. SAINTE.BEUVE. In Three Volumes. 3 3$. net. 

MEMOIRS OF THE DUG DE SAINT-SIMON. On 

the Times ot Louis XIV. and the Regency. Translated and arranged 
from the edition collated with the original manuscript by M. CHERUEL. 
Four Volumes. .Price 4 45. net. 

THE CORRESPONDENCE OF MADAME, PRIN 
CESS PALATINE, Mother of the Regent; of MAR-E ADELAIDE DE 
SAVOIE, Duchesse de Bourgogne ; and of Mndame DE MAINTENON, in 
relation to Saint-Cyr. Preceded by Introductions from C.-A. SAINTE- 
BEUVE. One Volume. 2u. net. 

JOURNAL AND MEMOIRS OF THE MARQUIS 

D'ARGENSON. Published from the Autograph MaS. in the Library of 
the Louvre. By E. J. B. RATHERY With an Introduction by C.-A. 
SAINTE-BEUVE. In Two Volumes. 2 29. net. 

MEMOIRS AND LETTERS OF CARDINAL DE 
BERNIS. With an Introduction by C.-A. SAINTE-BEUVE. In Two 
Volumes. 2 vs. net. 

LETTERS OF MLLE. DE LESPINASSE. With Notes 
on her Life and Character, by D' ^LEMBERT, MARMONTEL, DE GUIBERT. 
&c., and an Introduction by C.-A. SAINTE-BEUVE. In One Volume. 
2is. net. 

THE PRINCE DE LIGNE. His Memoirs, Letters, and 
Miscellaneous Papers. With Introduction and Preface by C.-A. SAINTE- 
BEUVE and Madame de STAEL-HOLSTEIN. Two Vo'umes. 42$. net. 

DIARY AND CORRESPONDENCE OF COUNT 

AXEL FERSEN, Grand Marshal of Sweden, relating to the Court of 
France. In One Volume. 2U. net. 

THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF MADAME ELISA 
BETH DE FRANCE, followed by the Journal of the Temple by CLERY, 
and the narrative of Marie Therese de France by the DUCHESSE 
U'ANGOULEME. In One Volume. ?is. net. 

THE BOOK OF ILLUSTRIOUS LADIES. By PIERRE 
DE BOURDEILLE, ABB DE BRANTOME. With Elucidations on some of 
those Ladies by C- -4- SAINTE-BEUVE. One Volume. 2if.net. 



MR. II EJN EM ANN'S LIST. 



3Bio0rapbs an& Correspondence. 

THE LOVE LETTERS OF PRINCE BISMARCK. 

Edited by PRINCE HERBERT BISMARCK. Wiih Portraits. In Two 
Volumes. Demy 8vo, zoj. net. 

THE MEMOIRS OF VICTOR HUGO. With a Preface 
by PAUL MEUKICE. Translated by JOHN W. HARDING. With a Por 
trait, 8vo. Price iar. net. 

WILLIAM COTTON OS WELL, Hunter and Explorer. 

The Story of his Life with certain correspondence and extracts from u.e 
private journal of DAVID LIVINGSTONE hitherto unpublished. By h s 
eldest son W. EDWARD OswELLof The Middle Temp:e Barnsier-at-Lw. 
With an Introduction by FRANCIS GALTON, D.C.L., F.R.S., F.R.G.S. &c. 
In Two Volumes, with Portraits, Maps and Illustrations. Demy Svo, 
i jr. net. 

THE LIFE AND LETTERS OF JOHN DONNE 

(DEAN OF ST. PAUL'S). Now for the first lime Revised and Col 
lected by EDMUND GOSSE, M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge, Hon. 
LL.D. of the University of St. Andrews. In Two Volumes, Svo. Price 
24$. net. 

THE PAGET PAPERS. Diplomatic and other Corre 
spondence of The Right Hon. SIR ARTHUR PAGET, G.C.B., 1794- 
1807. With two Appendices, 1808 and 1828-1829. Arranged and Ecited 
by his son, The Right Hon. Sir AUGUSTUS B. PAGET, G.C.B., late Her 
Majesty's Ambassador in Vienna. With Notes by Mrs. J. R. GREEN. 
New Edition with Index. In Two Volumes, demy Svo, with Portraits, 
32;. net. 

DE QUINCEY MEMORIALS. Being Letters and other 

Records here first Published, with Communications from COLERIDGE, the 
WORDSWORTHS, HANNAH MORE, PROFESSOR WILSON, and others. Edacd 
with Introduction, Notes, and Narrative, by ALEXANDER H. JAPP LL.D., 
F.R.S.E. In Two Volumes, demy Svo, cloth, with Portraits, ya. net. 

LETTERS OF SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE. 

Edited by ERNEST HARTLEY COLERIDGE. With 16 Portraits and Illus 
trations. In Two Volumes, demy Svo, 1 izs. 

MEMOIR OF ROBERT, EARL NUGENT. With Letters, 

Poems, and Appendices. By CLAUD NUGENT. With reproductions from 
Family Portraits by Sir GODFREY KNELLER, Sir JOSHUA REYNOLDS, 
GAINSBOROUGH, and others. In One Volume, Svo. Pr.ce i6s. 

FROM CROMWELL TO WELLINGTON. Twelve 

Soldiers. Edited by SPENSER WILKINSON. With an Introduction by 
Field-Marfhal Lord ROBERTS OF KANDAHAR. With Portraits and Plans. 
Svo, los. (>d. 

FROM HOWARD TO NELSON. Twelve Sailors. Edited 
by JOHN KNOX LAUGHTON, M.A. Wi h Portraits and Maps. Svo, los. (xt. 

NEW LETTERS OF NAPOLEON I. Omitted from the 
Edition published under the auspices of Napoleon III Translated 
from the French by Lady MARY LOYD. In One Volume, demy Svo, with 
Frontispiece. Price i^s. net 

MEMOIRS OF SERGEANT BOURGOGNE (1812-1813). 

Authorised Translation, fiom the French Original edited by PAUL COTTIM 
and MAUKICE HENAULT. With a Fronti>piece. Svo, cloth. Price 6s. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



THE LIFE OF JUDGE JEFFREYS. By H. B. IRVING, 

M.A. Oxon. Demy 8vo, with Three Portraits and a Facsimile, izs. t>d. net. 

STUDIES OF FRENCH CRIMINALS OF THE 
NINETEENTH CENTURY. By H. B. IRVING. Demy 8vo, ior. net. 

MARYSIENKA: Marie de la Grange d'Arquien, Queen of 
Poland, and Wife of Sobieski (1641-1716). By K. WALISZEWSKI. Trans 
lated from the French by Lady MARY LOYD. In One Volume, with 
Portrait. 8vo, cloth. Price izs. net. 

PETER THE GREAT. By K. WALISZEWSKI, Author of 

"The Romance of an Empress," "The Story of a Throne." Translated 
from the French by Lady MARY LOYD. With a Portrait. 8vo, cloth, 6s. ; 
or Library Edition, in Two Volumes, 8vo, 285. 

CARDINAL MANNING. From the French of FRANCIS DE 

PRESSENS by E. INGALL. Crown 8vo, 5.1. 

THE PALMY DAYS OF NANCE OLDFIELD. By 

EDWARD ROBINS. With Portraits. 8vo, 12$. 6d. 

AS OTHERS SAW HIM. A Retrospect, A.D. 54. Crown 
8vo, gilt top, 6s. 

BROTHER AND SISTER. A Memoir and the Letters of 
ERNEST and HENRIETTE RENAN. ^Translated by Lady MARY 
LOYD. Demy 8vo, with Two Portraits in Photogravure, and Four 
Illustrations, 14$. 

CHARLES GOUNOD. Autobiographical Reminiscences with 
Family Letters and Notes on Music. Translated by the Hon. W. HELY 
HUTCHINSON. Demy Svo, with Portrait, los. 6d. 

MEMOIRS. By CHARLES GODFREY LELAND (HANS BREIT- 

MANN). Second Edition. Svo, with Portrait, price 7$. 6d. 
EDMOND AND JULES DE GONCOURT. Letters and 

Leaves from their Journals. Selected. In Two Volumes, Svo, with 
Eight Portraits, 32$. 

ALEXANDER III. OF RUSSIA. By CHARLES LOWE, 

M.A., Author of " Prince Bismarck : an Historical Biography." Crown 
Svo, with Portrait in Photogravure, 6*. 

PRINCE BISMARCK. An Historical Biography. By 
CHARLES LOWE, M.A. With Two Portraits. Cheap Edition, crown Svo, 
21. d. 

MY FATHER AND I. A Book for Daughters. By the 
Countess PULIGA. Crown Svo, with Four Portraits, 6s. 

STORY OF THE PRINCESS DES URSINS IN SPAIN 
(Camarera-Mayor). By CONSTANCE HILL. With 12 Portraits and a 
Frontispiece. In One Volume, Svo. Pi ice 7^. dd. net. 

CATHERINE SFORZA. By COUNT PASOI.INI. Abridged 
and Tran>lated by PAUL SYLVESTER. Illustrated with numerous repro 
ductions from Original Pictures and documents. Demy Svo, i6s. 

VILLIERS DE L'ISLE ADAM : His Life and Works. 

From the French of Vicomte ROBERT DU PONTAVICE DE HEUSSEY. 
By Lady MARY LOYD. With Portrait and Facsimile. Crown Svo, cloth. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



THE LIFE OF HENRIK IBSEN. By HENRIK J, HOICK. 

Translated by CLARA BELL. With the Verse dene into English from the 
Norwegian Original by EDMUND GOSSE. Crown 8vo, cloth, 6s 

RECOLLECTIONS OF MIDDLE LIFE. By FRANCISQUE 
SARCEY. Translated by E. L. CAREY. 8vo, with Portrait, tos dd, 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS IN THE SECRET SERVICE. 

The Recollections of a Spy. By Major HENRI LE CARON. With New 
Preface. 8vo, boards, price is. bti., or cloth, 3.?. 6ii. 

* The Library Edition, with Portraits and Facsimiles, Zvo, 14.1., is still 
en sale. 

STUDIES IN FRANKNESS. By CHARLES WHIBI.EY. 

Crown 8vo, with Frontispiece, price 7$. 6d. 

A BOOK OF SCOUNDRELS. By CHARLES WHIBI.EY. 

Crown Svo, with Frontispiece, price js. 6ti. 

THE PAGEANTRY OF LIFE. By CHARLES WHIBI.EY. 

Crown Svo, with Frontispiece, price 7$. 6d. 

THE DIARY OF A CONDEMNED MAN. By ALFRED 

HERMANN FRIED. Translated from the German by S. VAN STRAALEN. 
Crown Svo, 2s. 6rf. 

THE WOMEN OF HOMER. By WALTER COPLAND 

PERRY. With numerous Illustrations, large crown Svo, 6s. 

THE LOVE LETTERS OF MR. H. AND MISS R. 

1775-1779. Edited by GILBEKT BURGESS. Square crown Svo, .-. 

LETTERS OF A BARITONE. By FRANCIS WALKER. 

Square crown Svo, $s. 

LETTERS OF A COUNTRY VICAR. Translated from 
the French of YVES LE QUERDEC. By M. GORDON HOLLIES. Crown 
Svo, 55. 



GREAT LIVES AND EVENTS. 

Uniformly bound in cloth, 6s. each volume. 
RECOLLECTIONS OF COUNT LEO TOLSTOY. 

Together with a Letter to the Women of France on the " Kreutzer 
Sonata." By C. A. BEHRS. Translated from the Russian by C. E. 
TURNER, English Lecturer in the University of St. Pe ersburg. Wfth 
Portrait. 

THE FAMILY LIFE OF HEINRICH HEINE. Illus 
trated by one hundred and twenty-two hitherto unpublished letters ad. 
dressed by him to different members of his family. Edited by his nephew 
Baron LUDVVIG VON EMHDEN, and translated by CHARLES GODFREY 
LELAND. With 4 Portraits. 

THE NATURALIST OF THE SEA-SHORE. The Life 

of Philip Henry Gosse. By his son, EnMUND GOSSE, Hon. M.A. 
Trinity College, Cambridge. With a Portrait. 

MEMOIRS OF THE PRINCE DE JOINVILLE. 

Translated from the French by Lady MARY LOYD. With 78 Illustrations 
from drawings by the Author. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON. A Study of His Life and 
Work. By ARTHUR WAUGH, B.A. Oxon. With Twenty Illustrations 
from Photographs specially taken for this Work. Five Portraits, and 
Facsimile of Tennyson's MS. 

NAPOLEON AND THE FAIR SEX. From the French 
of FREDERIC MASSON. With a Portrait. 

PETER THE GREAT. By K. WALISZEWSKI. Translated 
from the French by Lady MARY LOYD. With a Portrait. 

THE STORY OF A THRONE. Catherine II. of Russia. 
From the French of K. WALISZEWSKI. With a Portrait. 

THE ROMANCE OF AN EMPRESS. Catherine II. of 

Russia. From the French of K. WALISZEWSKI. With a Portrait. 

A FRIEND OF THE QUEEN. Marie Antoinette and 
Count Fersen. From the French of PAUL GAULOT. Two Portraits. 



anfc 6eoorapb. 
THE REGIONS OF THE WORLD 

A New Geographical Series. Edited by H. J. MA CKINDER, 

At. A., Student of Christ Church, Reader in Geography in 

the University of Oxford, Principal of Rending College. 

The Series will consist of Twelve Volumes, each being an essay 
descriptive of a great natural region, its marked physical features, 
and the life of its peoples.' Fully Illustrated in the Text ai d 
with many Maps and Diagrams. 

LIST OF THE SUBJECTS AND A UTI1ORS: 

1. BRITAIN AND THE BRITISH SEAS. By the 

EDITOR. {Ready. 

2. SCANDINAVIA AND THE ARCTIC OCEAN. By 

Sir CLEMENTS R. MARKHAM, K.C.B., F.R.S., President of the Royal 
Geographical Society. 

3. THE MEDITERRANEAN AND FRANCE. By 

ELISEE RECLUS, Professor of Geography in the New University of 
Brussels, Author of the " Nouvelle Geographic Universelle." 

4. CENTRAL EUROPE. By Dr. JOSEPH PARTSCH, Pro 

fessor of Geography in the University of Breslau. 

5. AFRICA. By Dr. J. SCOTT KELTIE, Secretary of the Royal 

Geographical Society, Editor of " The Statesman's Year Book," Author 
of " The Partition of Africa." 

6. THE NEARER EAST. By D. G.HOGARTH, M.A., Fellow 

of Magdalen College, Oxford, Director of the British School at Athens, 
Author of "A Wandering Scholar in the Levant." 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



7. THE RUSSIAN EMPIRE By PRINCE KROPOIKIX 

An nor of the Ar.ides "Russia," "Siberia" and "Turkestan" in the 
" Encyclopaedia t-ritannica. ' 

8. THE FARTHER EAST. By ARCHIBALD LITTLE, 

Author of " Through the Yang-tse Gorges." 

9. INDIA. By Col. Sir THOMAS HOI.DICH, K.C.I. E., C.B., 

R.E., Superintendent of Imian Frontier Surveys. 

10. AUSTRALASIA AND ANTARCTICA. By H. O. 

FORBES, LL.D. Director of Museums to the Corporation cf Liverpool, 
formerly Director of the Chri.stchurch Museum, N.Z., Author of "A 
Naturalist's Wanderings in the Eastern Archipelago," " A Handbook to 
the Primates.' 

11. NORTH AMERICA. By ISRAEL C. RUSSELL, Pro essir 

of Geography in the University of Michigan. 

12. SOUTH AMERICA. By J. C. BRANNER, Professor of 

Geology in th Stanford University, California. 



THE WORLD'S HISTORY. 

A Survey of Man's Record, 
Edited by Dr. H. F. HELMOLT. 

To be completed in Eight Volumes. Royal 8vo. With many Maps, 
Colound Plates, and Black-and-white Illustrations. Price in cloth 15^. 
net per volume, or in half morocco, 211'. net. 

1. PRE-HISTORY: AMERICA AND THE PACIFIC 

OCEAN. With an Introductory Essay by the Right Hon. JAMES BKVCE, 
D.C L., LL.D., F.R.S. [Kcaly 

2. OCEANIA, EASTERN ASIA AND THE INDIAN 

OCEAN. 

3. WESTERN ASIA AFRICA. 

4. THE MEDITERRANEAN NATIONS. {Ready. 

5. EASTERN EUROPE THE SLAVS. 

6. THE TEUTON AND LATIN RACES. 

7. WESTERN EUROPE TO 1800. 

8. WESTERN EUROPE SINCE 1800 THE ATLAN 

TIC OCEAN. 

THE GREAT PEOPLE'S SERIES. 

Edited by F. YORK POWELL, ALA. 

1. THE SPANISH PEOPLE. Their Origin, Growth, and 

Influence. l!y MARTIN A. S. HUME. Crown 8vo 6s. 

2. THE FRENCH PEOPLE. By ARTHUR HASSALL, M.A. 

Crown 8vo, 6s. 

3. THE RUSSIAN PEOPLE. By J. FITZMAURICE-KELLV. 

\_ln preparation. 



10 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



A POLITICAL HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY 

EUROPE, SINCE 1814. Translated from the French of CHARLES. 
SEIGNOBOS. In M wo Volumes, Dt my 8vo, yos. net. 

THE CHILDREN OF THE NATIONS. A Suly of 
Colonisation and Its Problems. By POULTNEY BIGELOW, M.A., F.R.G.S. 
8vo, los. net. 

THE GENESIS OF THE UNITED STATES. A 

Narrative of the Movement in England, 1605-1616, which resulted in the 
Plantation of North America by English. nen, disclosing the Contest 
between England and Spain for the Possession of the Soil now occupied 
by the United States of America ; set forth through a series of Historical 
Manuscripts now first printed, together with a Re-issae of Rare Contem 
poraneous Tracts, accoinoinied by Bibliographical Memoranda. Notes, 
and Brief Biographies. Collected, Ai ranged, and Edited by ALEXANDER 
BROWN, F.R H.S. With 100 Portraits, Maps, and Plans. In Two Volumes, 
roval 8vo. buckram, ,$ 13*. 6rf. net. 

DENMARK: its His'ory, Topography, Language, Literature. 
Fine Arts, Social Life, and Finance. Edited by H. WEITEMEVER. Demy 
Svo, cloth, with Map, 12.1. 6d. 

%* Dedicated, by permission, to H.M. the Queen. 

THE LITTLE MANX NATION. (Lectures delivered at 
the Royal Institution, 1891.) By HALL CAINE, Author of "The Bond 
man," " The Scapegoat," &c. Crown Svo, cloth, y. bd.; paper, 2$. dd. 

ANNALS OF SANDHURST. A Chronicle of the Royal 
Military College from its Foundation to the Present Day, with a Sketch of 
the History of the Staff College. By M^jor A. F. MOCKI.ER-FERRYMAN. 
With 12 full-pige Illustrations. Demy Svo, iof. net. 

THE MODERN JEW. By ARNOLD WHITE. Crown Svo, 

half-leather, gilt top, -js, (>d. 

ISRAEL AMONG THE NATIONS. Translated from the 
French of ANATOLE LEROY-BEAULIEU, Member of the Institute of France. 
Crown Svo, -js. (>d. 

THE JEW AT HOME. Impressions of a Summer and 
Autumn Spent with Him in Austria and Russia. By JOSEPH PENNELL. 
With Illustrations by the Author. 410, cloth, 5$. 

SPANISH PROTESTANTS IN THE SIXTEENTH 

CENTURY. Compiled from Dr. Wilken's German Work. By RACHEL 
CHALLICE. With an Introduction by the Most Rev. Lord PLUNKET, 
late Archbishop of Dublin, and a Preface by the Rev. Canon FLEMING. 
Crown 8vo, 4.1. 6J. net. 

QUEEN JOANNA I. OF NAPLES, SICILY, AND 

JERUSALEM : Countess of Provence, Forcalquier, and Piedmont. An 
Essay on her Times. By ST. CLAIR BABDELEV. Imperial Svo, with 
numerous Illustrations, nt, 

CHARLES III. OF NAPLES AND URBAN VI.; also 

CECCO D'ASCOLI, Poet, Astrologer, Physician. Two Historical Essays. 
By ST. CLAIR BADDEI.EY. With illustrations, Svo, cloth, icr. 6r\ 

ROBERT THE WISE AND HIS HEIRS, 1278-1352. 
By ST. CLAIR BADDELEY. Svo, zis. 

MY PARIS NOTE-BOOK. By ALBERT D. VANDAM, Author 

of " An Englishman in Paris." Demy Svo, price as. dd. net. 
UNDERCURRENTS OF THE SECOND EMPIRE. 

By ALBERT D. VANDAM. Demy Svo, cloth, js. d-.i. net. 

STUDIES IN DIPLOMACY. By Count BEN EDETTI, French 

Ambassador at the Court of Berlin. Demy Svo, with a Portrait, 10^. ftd. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. n 

AN AMBASSADOR OF THE VANQUISHED. 

Viscount Elie De Gontaut-Biron's Mission to Berlin, 1871-1877. From 
his Diaries and Memoranda. By the Duke DE BROGLIE. Translated 
with Notes by ALBERT D. VANDAM. In One Volume, 8vo, icu. 6d. 

1812. NAPOLEON I. IN RUSSIA. By VASSILI VEREST- 

CHAGIN. With an Introduction by R. WHITEING. Illustrated from 
Sketches and Paintings by the Author. Crown Svo, 6s. 

KRUPP'S STEEL WORKS. By FRIEDRICH C. G.MiiLLER. 

With 88 Illustrations by FELIX SCHMIDT and ANDERS MONTAN. 
Authorised Translation from the German. 410. Price 25$. net. 

THE REALM OF THE HABSBURGS. By SIDNEY 

WHITMAN, Author of " Imperial Germany." Crown 8vo, 7$. 6d. 
IMPERIAL GERMANY. A Critical Study ot Fact and 
Character. By SIDNEY WHITMAN. New Edition, Revised and Enlarged. 
Crown Svo, cloth, zs, 6d. ; paper, 25 . 

politics ano (Questions of tbe 2>a. 

THE MASTERY OF THE PACIFIC. By ARCHIBALD 

COLQUHOUN. With Maps and Illustrations. Demy Svo, i8s. net. 
ALL THE RUSSIAS. Travels and Studies of Contemporary 
Conditions and Problems in European Russia, Finland, Siberia, the 
Caucasus, and Central Asia. By HENRY NORMAN, M.P.. Author ot 
" Peoples and Problems of the Far East," " The Real Japan," &c. With 
many Illustrations and Maps. Demy Svo. 

LORD MILNER, HIS LIFE AND WORK. By IWAN 

MULLER. With Two Portraits. Demy 8% o. 

CLARA IN BLUNDERLAND. By CAROLINE LEWIS. 

With 40 Illustrations by S. R. Crown Svo, ys. 6d. 

THE NEW SOUTH AFRICA. Its Value and Development. 
By W. BLELOCH. In One Volume, demy Svo, with Illustrations, Maps, 
and Diagrams. Price los. net. 

THE TRANSVAAL FROM WITHIN. A Private Record 
of Public Affairs. By J. P. FITZPATRICK. With a Map and New Intro 
duction. Library Edition, Svo, cloth, los. net. ; Popular Edition, crown 
Svo, 2S. 6d. net ; P. per Edition, 6d. n>-t. 

THE RISE AND FALL OF KRUGERISM. A Personal 
Record of Forty Years in South Africa. By JOHN SCOBLE. Times 
Correspondent in Pretoria prior to the present war, and H. R. ABER- 
CROMBIE, of the Intelligence Department, Cape Colony. Library Edition, 
Svo, cloth, los. net ; Popular Edition, 25-. 6d. net. 

THE SOUTH AFRICAN CONSPIRACY, OR THE 

AIMS OF AFRIKANDERDOM. By FRED. W. BELL, F.S.S. Demy 

WHYKRUGER MADE WAR, OR BEHIND THE 
BOER SCENES. By JOHN A. BUTTRRY. With Two Chapters on the 
Past and Future of the Rand, and the Mining Industry. By A. COOPER 
KEY. Crown Svo, 33-. 6d. 

CHINA AND THE ALLIES. By A. HENRY SAVAGE 

LANDOR, Author of " In the Forbidden Land," &c. In Two Volumes, 
demy Svo, with numerous Maps and Illustrations. Price 28.1. net. 

THE AWAKENING OF THE EAST. SIBERIA JAPAN 
CHINA. By PIERRE LEROY-BEAULIEU. Translated by RICHARD 
DAVEY. With a Preface by HENRY NORMAN. Crown Svo, 6s. 

THE QUEEN'S SERVICE. Being the Experience* of a 
Private Soldier in the British Infantry at Home and Abroad. By HORACE 
WYNDHAM, late of the th Regt. 3*. 6tf. 

CAN WE DISARM? By JOSEPH McCABE. Written in Col 
laboration with GEORGES DARIEN Crown Svo, cloth, is. dd. 

A3 



12 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 

TROOPER 3809. A Private Soldier of the Third Republic. 
By LIOXEL DECLE, Auiiior of "Three Years in Savage Africa." Witli 
Eight Illustrations by H. CHAKTIER. Crown 8vo, 6r. 

MADE IN GERMANY. Reprinted with Additions from 
The New Review. By ERNEST E. WILLIAMS. Crown 8vo, cloth, vs. 6d. 
Also Popular Edition, paper covers, is. 

THE FOREIGNER IN THE FARMYARD. By ERNEST 

E. WILLIAMS, Author of " Made in Germany." Crown 8vo, zs 6d. 
THE WORKERS. An Experiment in Reality. By WALTER 
A. WVCKOFF. The East. With Five Illustrations, crown 8vo. Price 

THE 3 'WORKERS. An Experiment in Realty. By WALTER 

A WYCKOFF. The West. With Twelve Illustrations, crown 8v. Piice 
y. net. ** The Two Volumes in Card Box, 6s. net. 

Sport, Hoventure, ano travel. 

NICHOLSON'S ALMANAC OF TWELVE SPORTS 

SPORT^IN WAR. By Lieut.-General R. S. S. BADEN- 
POWELL, F.R.G.S. With 19 Illustrations by thi Author. Crown Svo, 
3 i. 6<i. 

CRICKET IN MANY CLIMES. By P. F. WARNER. With 

73 Illustrations from Photographs. Crown 8vo, 7$. fxi. Also Cheap 
Edi ion, paper cover, 2s. 6d. 

PINK AND SCARLET; or, Hunting as a School for Soldiering. 
By Lieut.-Colonel E. A. H. ALDERSON, D.S.C., The Queen's Own 
Regiment. Illustrated. Demy 8vo, cloth, 7^. 6ti. net. 

DRIVING FOR PLEASURE; or, The Harness Stable and 
its Appointments. By FRANCIS T. UNDEKIIILL. Illustrated with One 
Hundred and Twenty-four full-page Plates. Imperial 8vo, buckram 
sides, leather back, pi ice 28^. net. 

THROUGH THE FIRST ANTARCTIC NIGHT, 1898- 

1899. A narrative of the voyage of the Belgica, among newly discovered 
lands and over an unknown sea about the South Pole. By FRF.DERICK 
A. COOK, M.D., Surgeon and Anthropologist of the Belgian Antarctic 
Expedition. With an appendix, containing a summary of the Scicivilic 
Result-. Demy 8vo, Cloth, with 4 Coloured plates, an I ov^r 100 
Illustrations from photographs and drawings. 2OJ. net. 

ITALIAN JOURNEYS. By W. D. HOWELLS. With 103 

Illustrations by JOSEPH PENNELL. Pott 410, los. net. 

A LITTLE TOUR IN FRANCE. By HENRY JAMES. 

With 94 Illustrations by JUSEPH PENNELL. Pott 410, ioif.net. 

MOUNT OMI AND BEYOND: A Record of Travel on the 
Thibetan Border. By ARCHIBALD JOHN LITTLE, F.R.G.S. Author ol 
" Through the Yangtsi Gorges," &c. With a Map, Portrait, and 15 
Illustrati -.ns, from Photographs by MRS. LITTLE, los. net. 

INNERMOST ASIA. Travel and Sport in the Pamirs. By 
RALPH P. COBBOLD, late 6oth Rifles. Wuh Maps and Illustrations. 
L)emy Svo, cloth, air. 

IN THE FORBIDDEN LAND. An Account of a Journey 
in Tibet; Capture by the Tibetan Authorities; Imprisonment, Torture, 
and Ultimate Rrle.-xse. By A. HENRY SAVAGE LANDOR, Author of 
''Corea, the Land of the Morning Calm," &c. Also various Official Docu 
ments, including the Knquiry and Report by J. LANKIN, Esq., Appointed 
by the Government of India. Wish a Map and 250 Illustrations. Popular 
Edition in one volume. Large Svo. Price 7.1. 6J. net. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 13 



COREA, OR CHO-SEN, THE LAND OF THE MORN 
ING CALM. By A. HENUY SAVAGE LANDOR. With 38 Illustrati ns 
from Drawings by the Author, and a Portrait, demy 8vo, i8j 

THE INDIAN FRONTIER WAR. Being an Account of 
the Mohmuud and Tirah Expeditions, iSgy. By LIONEL JAMES, Special 
Correspondent for Reuter's Agency and Ariist for the Graphic. With 32 
full-page Illustrations from Drawings by the Author, and Photographs, 
and 10 Plans and Maps. 8vo, price ^s. (>d. 

WITH THE ZHOB FIELD FORCE, 1890. By Captain 
CRAWFORD McFALL, K.O. Y.L.I. Demy 8vo, with Illustrations, i8j. 

ROMANTIC INDIA. By ANDRE CHEVRILLON. Translated 
from the French by WILLIAM MARCHANT. 8vo, js. 6d. net. 

UNDER THE DRAGON FLAG. My Experiences in 
the Chino-Japanese War. By JAMES ALLAN. Crown 8vo, 2j. 

THE LAST OF THE MASAI. By SIDNEY LANGFORD 

HINDE and HILDEGARD HINDE. With Illustrations from Photographs 
and Drawings. 410. 15.?. net. 

UNDER THE AFRICAN SUN. A Description of Native 
Races in Uganda. Sporting Adventures and other Experiences. By W. 
J. ANSORGE, M.A., LL.D., M.R.C.S., L.R.C.P., late Senior Professor at 
the Royal College of Mauritius, Medical Officer to Her Majesty's Govern 
ment in Uganda. With 134 Illustrations from Photographs by the Author 
and Two Coloured Plates. Royal 8vo. Price 2is. net. 

MOGREB-EL-ACKSA. A Journey in Morocco. By R. B. 
CUNNINGHAMS GRAHAM. With a Portrait and Map. In One Volume, 
8vo. Price gs. 

TIMBUCTOO THE MYSTERIOUS. By FELIX DUBOIS. 

Translated from the French by DIANA WHITE. With 153 Illustrations 
from Photogiaphs and Drawings made on the spot, and Eleven Maps and 
Plans. Demy 8vo, I2S. 6d. 

TRAVELS IN WESTERN AUSTRALIA. Being a 

Description of the various Cities and Towns, Goldfields, and Agricultural 
Districts of that Sta'e. By MAY VIVIENNE. Second Impression, demy 
8vo, with numerous Illustrations. Price 6s. 

RHODESIA PAST AND PRESENT. By S. J. Du Torr. 

In One Volume, 8vo, with Sixteen full-page Illustrations, js. 6d. 

THE NEW AFRICA. A Journey up the Chobe and down the 
Okovanga Rivers. By AUREL SCHULZ, M.D., and AUGUST HAMMAR, 
C.E. In One Volume, demy 8vo, with Illustrations, z&s. 

ACTUAL AFRICA; or, The Coming Continent. A Tour of 
Exploration. By FRANK VINCENT, Author of "The Land of the White 
Elephant." With Map and over 100 Illustrations, demy 8vo, cloth, priee 
34*. 

A VANISHED ARCADIA. By R. B. CUNNINGHAMS 

GRAHAM. Demy Svo, gs. 
AMERICA TO-DAY. Observations and Reflections. By 

WILLIAM ARCHER. Crown Svo, cloth, 6.5-. 
AMERICA AND THE AMERICANS. From a French 

Point of View. In one volume. Crown Svo, 35. 6d. 

TWELVE MONTHS IN KLONDIKE. By ROBERT C. 

KIRK. With 100 Illustrations and a Map. Crown Svo, cloth. 6s. net. 

THE CUBAN AND PORTO-RICAN CAMPAIGNS. By 

RICHARD HARDING DAVIS, F. K.G S. With IIQ lllusintions from Photo 
graphs and Drawings on the Spot, and Maps. Crown 8vo, cloth, 7*. 6rf net. 



I 4 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 

CUBA IN WARTIME. By RICHARD HARDING DAVIS, Author 

of "Soldiers of Fortune." With numerous Illustrations by FREDERIC 
REMINGTON. Crown 8vo, price 3.?. 6d. 

THE LAND OF THE MUSKEG. By H. SOMERS SOMERSET. 

Second Edition. Demy 8vo with Maps and over too Illustrations, 280 pp., 
14$. net. 

THE OUTGOING TURK. Impressions of a Journey through 
the Western Balkans. By H C. THOMSON, Author of ' The Chitral 
Campaign." Demy 8vo, with Illustrations from Original Photographs. 

NOTES "FOR THE NILE. Together with a Metrical 
Rendering of the Hymns of Ancient Egypt and of the Precepts of Ptah- 
hotep (theoldest book in the world). By HARDWICKE D. RAWNSLKV, M. A 
Imperial i6mo, cloth, 5*. 

UNDER QUEEN AND KHEDIVE. The Autobiography 
of an Anglo-Egyptian Official. By Sir W. F. MIEVILI.E, K.C.M.G. 
Crown 8vo, with Portrait, price 6s. 

MONTE CARLO ANECDOTES AND SYSTEMS OF 

PLAY. By V. B., Author of " Ten Days at Monte Carlo." Fcap. 8vo, is. 

TEN DAYS AT MONTE CARLO AT THE BANK'S 

EXPENSE. Containing Hints to Visitors and a General Guide to the 
Neighbourhood. By V. B. Fcap. 8vo, zs. 

IN THE TRACK OF THE SUN. Readings from the Diary 
of a Globe-Trotter. By FREDERICK DIODATI THOMPSON. With many 
Illustrations by Mr. HARRY FENN and from Photographs. 4to, 25*. 

THE CANADIAN GUIDE-BOOK. Parti. The Tourist's 

and Sportsman's Guide to Eastern Canada and Newfoundland, including full 
descriptions of Routes, Cities, Points of Interest, Summer Resorts, Fishing 
Places, &c., in Eastern Ontario, The Muskoka District, The St. Lawrence 
Region. The Lake St. John Country, The Maritime Provinces. Prince 
Edward Island, and Newfoundland. With an Appendix eiving Fish and 
Game Laws, and Official Lists of Trout and Salmon Rivers and their 
Lessees. By CHARLES G. D. ROBERTS, Professor of English Literature in 
King's College, Windsor, N.S. With Maps and many Illustrations. 
Crown 8vo, limp cloth, 6s. 

THE CANADIAN GUIDE-BOOK. Part II. WESTERN 

CANADA. Including the Peninsula and Northern Regions of Ontario, 
the Canadian Shores of the Great Lakes, the Lake of the Woods Region, 
Manitoba and "The Great NorthAVest," The Canadian Rocky Mounlains 
and National Park, British Columbia, and Vancouver Island. By ERNEST 
INGERSOLL. With Maps and many Illustrations. Crown 8vo, limp cloth, 6s. 

THE GUIDE-BOOK TO ALASKA AND THE NORTH 
WEST COAST, including the Shores of Washington, British Columbia, 
South- Eastern Alaska, the A'eutian and the Sea Islands, the Behring 
and the Arctic Coasts. By E. R. SCIDMORE With Maps and many 
Illustrations. Crown 8vo, limp cloth, 6s. 

EVERYBODY'S PARIS. A Piactical Guide containing 
Information as to Meani of Locomotion, Hotels, Restaurants, Cafes, 
Theatres. Shops, Museums, Buildings, and Monuments, Daily Life and 
Habi's, the Curiosities of Paris, &c. A rapid and easy method of seeing 
everything in a limited time and at a moderate cost. With many Illus 
trations, Maps, and Plans. Crown 8vo, paper, is. xi. net, or in cloth, 
as. fxi. net. 

Essays anfc Belles Xettres, Sic. 

THE SOUL OF A CAT AND OTHER STORIES. By 

MARGARET BENSON. With Illustrations by HENRIETTA RONNHR and 
from Photographs. Crown 8vr>, 31. &d. 

ESSAYS OF AN EX-LIBRARIAN. By RICHARD GARXETT, 

C.B. Crown 8vo, 7$. 6d. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 15 



THE ETERNAL CONFLICT. An Essay by WILLIAM 

ROMAINE PATERSON (Benjamin Sw.ft) Crown 8vo, 6f. 

VILLAGE NOTES, and some other Papers. By PAMELA 

TENNANT. With Illustrations from Pnotographs. Crown 8vo, 6s. 
STUDIES IN STYLE. By W. H. HELM. Fcap. 8vo, gilt 

top, y. net. 

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. A Critical Study. By 
GEORGE BR ANDES, Pb.D Translated from the Danish bv WILLIAM 
ARCHER, DIANA WHITE, and MARY MORISON. Students' Edition. In 
One Volume, demy 8vo, buckram uncut, IOT net 

HENRIK IBSEN. BJORNSTJERNE BJORNSON. 

Critical Studies. By GEOKGH BRANDES. Authorised Tr'tislation from 
the Danish. With Introductions bv WILLIAM ARCHER. In One Volume, 
demy 8vo. Roxburgh, gilc top, or buckram uncut, los. net. 

MAIN CURRENTS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY 
LITERATURE. By GEORGE BRANDES. Vol. I. The Emigrant 
Literature. Demy 8vo. Price6i-.net. Vol. II. The Romantic School 
in Germany. Demy 8vo. 

THE SYMBOLIST MOVEMENT IN LITERATURE. 

By ARTHUR SYMONS. Crown Svo, buckram, 6s. 

CORRECTED IMPRESSIONS. Essays on Victoi ian Writers. 

By GEORGE SAINTSBURY. Crown Svo, tilt top, 7.?. 6./. 

ANIMA POETiE. From the unpublished note-books of SAMUEL 
TAYLOR COLERIDGE. Edited by ERNEST HARTLEY COLERIDGE. Crown 
Svo, 7*. 6<f. 

HYPOLYMPIA, OR THE GODS IN THE ISLAND. 

An Ironic Fantasy. By EDMUND GOSSE. Fcap. Svo, $J. 

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY STUDIES. A Contribu 
tion to the History of English Poetry. By EDMUND GOSSE, Clark 
Lecturer on English Literature at the University of Cambridge ; Hon. 
M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge. A Ne.v Edition. Crown Svo, 
buckram, j,ilt top, js. dd. 

CRITICAL KIT-KATS By EDMUND GOSSE. Crown Svo, 

buckram, gilt top, is. 6d. 

QUESTIONS AT ISSUE. Essays. By EDMUND GOSSE 

Crown Svo, buckram, gilt top, 7^. (>d. 

\* A Limited Edition on Large Paper, 25$. net. 

GOSSIP IN A LIBRARY. By EDMUND GOSSE. Third 

Edition. Crown Svo, buckram, gilt U p, 7$. 6d, 

** A Limited Edition on Large Paper, 255. net. 

ESSAYS. By ARTHUR CHRISTOPHER BENSON, of Eton College. 

Crown Svo, buckram, 7^. 6d. 

A COMMENTARY ON THE WORKS OF HENRIK 

IBSEN. By HJALMAR HJORTH BOYESEN. Crown Svo, cloth, js. 6d. net. 

THE POSTHUMOUS WORKS OF THOMAS DE 

QUINCEY. Edited, with Introduction and Notes from the Author's 
Original MSS., by ALEXANDER H. JAPP, LL.D., F.R.S.E., &c. Crown 
Svo, cloth, 6s. each. 

I. SUSPIRIA DE PROFUNDIS. With other Essays. 

II. CONVERSATION AND COLERIDGE. With other 

Essays. 



16 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



THE WORKS OF LORD BYRON. Edited by WILLIAM 
ERNEST HENLEY. To be completed in Twelve Volumes. (The l.eiters, 
Diaries, Controversies, Speeches, &c., in Four, and the Verse in Eight.) 
Small crown 8vo, price s-f. net each. 
VOL. I. LETTERS, 1804-1813. With Portrait after PHILLIPS. 

THE PROSE WORKS OF HEINRICH HEINE. 

Translated by CHARLKS GODFREY LELAND, M.A., F.R L.S. (HANS 
BREITMANN). In Eight Volumes. 

The Library Edition, in crown 8vo, cloth, at 5$. per Volume. Each Volume of 
this edition is sold separately. The Cabinet Edition, in special biiuiing, 
boxed, price 2 los. the set. The Large Paper Edition, limited lo 50 
Numbered Copies, price 15$. per Volume net, will only be supplied to 
subscribers for the Complete Work. 

I. FLORENTINE NIGHTS, SCHNABELEWOPSKI, 

THE RABBI OF BACHARACH, and SHAKE 
SPEARE'S MAIDENS AND WOMEN. 

II., III. PICTURES OF TRAVEL. 1823-1828. 

IV. THE SALON. Letters on Art, Music, Popular Life, 

and Politics. 

V., VI. GERMANY. 

VII., VIII. FRENCH AFFAIRS. Letters from Paris 

1832, and Lutetia. 

MR. FROUDE AND CARLYLE. By DAVID WILSON. In 

One Volume, 8vo, los. 6d. 

PARADOXES. By MAX NORDAU, Author of " Degeneration," 
"Conventional Lies of our Civilisation," &c Translated by J. R. 
MclLRAlTH \\ ith an Introduction by the Author written for this 
Edition. Demy 8vo, 17^. net. 

CONVENTIONAL LIES OF OUR CIVILIZATION. 

By MAX NORI AU. Author of " Degeneration." Second English Edition. 
Demy 8vo, 17^. net. 

DEGENERATION. By MAX NORDAU. Ninth English 

Edition. Demy 8vo, 17$. net. Also, a Popular Edition. 8vo. 6s. 

GENIUS AND DEGENERATION: A Psychological Study. 
By Dr. WILLIAM HIRSCH. Translated from the Second German Edition. 
Demy 8vo, 17.1. net. 

THE NON-RELIGION OF THE FUTURE. From the 
French of MARIE JEAN GUYAU. In One Volume, demy 8vo, 17$. net. 

STUDIES OF RELIGIOUS HISTORY. By ERNFST 

RENAN, late of the French Academy. 8vo, 7$. dd. 

MANNERS, CUSTOMS, AND OBSERVANCES: Their 
Origin and Signification. By LEOPOLD WAG.VER. Crown 8vo, 6s. 

THE GREAT WAR OF 189. A Forecast. By Rear. 
Admiral COLOMU, Col. MAURICE, R.A., Captain MAUDE, ARCHIIIAI.D 
FORBES, CHARLES Lowii, U. CHRISTIE MUKRAY, and F. SCUDAMORE. 
Second Edition. In One Volume, large Svo, with numerous Illus. 
trations, 6s. 

JOHN KING'S QUESTION CLASS. By CHARLES M. 

SHELDON, Author of " In His Steps," &c. Crown Svo, paper, 2$. ; cloth, 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 17 



THE WORD OF THE LORD UPON THE WATERS. 

Sermons rend by His Imperial Majesty the Emperor of Germany, while 
at Sea on his Voyages to the Land of the Midnight Sun. Compo>ed by 
Dr. RICH PER, Army Chaplain, and Translated from the German Ijy JOHN 
R. MclLKAiTH. 410, cloth, ys. 6d. 

THE KINGDOM OF GOD IS WITHIN YOU. 

Christianity not as a Mystic Religion but as a New Theory of Life. By 
Count LEO TOLSTOY. Translated from the Russian by CONSTANCE 
GARNETT. Popular Edition, cloth, ?s. fxi. 



^Domestic Economy. 



THE COMPLETE INDIAN HOUSEKEEPER AND 

COOK. Giving the Duties of Mistress and Servants, the Gen- ral 
Management of the House, and Practical Recipes for Cooking in all its 
Brandies. _By FLORA ANNIE STEEL and GRACE GARDINER. Fourth 
Kdition, revised to date. Crown 8vo. Price 6s. 

THE COOK'S DECAMERON. A Study in Taste. Con- 
taining over 200 recipes for Italian dishes. By Mrs. W. G. WATERS. Crown 
8vo. Price zs. 6ii. 

THE AMERICAN SALAD BOOK. The most Complete 

Oiiginal, and Useful Collection of Salad Recipes ever brought t> gether 
By MAXIMILIAN DE Lour. Crown 8vo, cloth. 2S. 6rf. 



(Barfcentno, JBotan& aut> IRatural 

THE ROSE : A Treatise on the Cultivation, Historv, Fnniily 
Characteristics, &c., of the various Groups of Roses. With Accurate 
Description of the Varieties now Generally Grown. By H. B lil.i.- 
\VANGEK. With an Introduction by GEORGE H. ELLVVANGEK 12010, 
cloth, S.T. 

THE GARDEN'S STORY; or, Pleasures and Tria's of an 
Amateur Gardener. By G. H. ELLWANGER. With an Introduction by ihe 
Rev. C. WOLLEY DOD. i2mo, cloth, with Illustrations, 5^. 

NATURE'S GARDEN. An Aid to Knowledge of Wild 
I 1 lowers and their Insect Visitors. With Coloured plates and many 
other Illustrations, photographed from Nature by HHNRY TROTH, ard 
A. R. UUGMOKE. Text by NELTJE BLANCHAN. Royal 8vo, 12.5. (et. net. 



Ifacetfaz, &c. 

CLARA IN BLUNDERLAND. By CAROLINE LEWIS. 

With 40 Illustrations by S. R. Crown 8vo, 2s. 6d. 

JOHN HENRY. By HUGH McHucn. Fcap. 8vo. Trice is. 
MR. DOOLEY'S OPINIONS. Crown 8vo, 3^. 6d. 

MR. DOOLEY'S PHILOSOPHY. With coloured Frontis 
piece, by WILLIAM NICHOLSON, and Illustrations by E. W. KFMIILK" 
and F. OPPER. Crown 8vo, 3^. 6d. 



i8 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 

THE POCKET IBSEN. A Collection of some o' the Master's 

best known Dramas, condensed, revised, and slightiy rearranged for tre 
benefit of the Earnest Student. By F. ANSTEY, Author of "Vice Versa," 
''Voces Populi," &c. With Illustrations reproduced, by permissioi, 
from Punch, and a new Frontispiece by BERNARD PARTRIDGE. New 
Edition. i6mo, cloth, 3.5. dd. ; or paper, 2.?. dd. 

FROM WISDOM COURT. By HENRY SETON MERRIMAN 

and STEPHEN GRAHAM TALLENTYRE. With 30 Illustrations by 
E. COURBOIN. Crown 8vo, cloth, y. dd. ; or picture boards, 2S. 

WOMAN THROUGH A MAN'S EYEGLASS. By 

MALCOLM C. SALAMAN. With Illustrations by DUDLEY HARDY. Crown 
8vo, cloth, 3$. dd. ; or picture boards, zs. 

THE SPINSTER'S SCRIP. As Compiled by CECIL 

RAYNOR. Narrow crown 8vo, limp cloth, zs. dd. . 

THE PINERO BIRTHDAY BOOK. Selected and arranged 

by MYRA HAMILTON. With a Portrait. i6mo, cloth, 2s. dd. 
STORIES OF GOLF. Collected by WILLIAM KNIGHT and 

T. T. OLIPHANT. With Rhymes'Ym Golf by various hands ; also Shake 
speare on Golf, &c. Enlarged Edition. Fcap. 8vo, cloth, 25. dd. 

Dramatic Xfterature* 

THE PIPER OF HAMELIN: A Fantastic Opera in Two 
Acts. By ROBERT BUCHANAN. With Illustrations by HUGH THOMSON. 
410, cloth, 2S. dd. net. 

THE TYRANNY OF TEARS. A Comedy in Four Acts. 
By C. HADDON CHAMBERS. i6mo, cloth, 2s. dd. ; paper, is. dd. 

THE AWAKENING. By C. HADDON CHAMBERS. i6mo, 

cloth, 2S. dd. ; paper, is. dd. 
GIOCONDA. A PI ay in Four Acts. By GABRIELE D'ANNUNZIO. 

Translated by ARTHUR SYMONS. Small 410, 3$. dd. 
THE DEAD CITY. A Pla) in Five Acts. By GABRIELE 

D'ANNUNZIO. Translated by ARTHUR SYMONS. Small 410, cloth, y. dd. 
JAPANESE PLAYS AND PLAY FELLOWS. By 

OSMAN EDWARDS. With 12 Plates, reproduced in colours from Japanese 

originals. 8vo, \os. net. 
KING ERIK; A Tiagedy. By EDMUND GOSSE. A Re-issue, 

with a Critical Introduction by Mr. THEODORE WATTS. Fcap. 8vo, 

boards, 5.?. net. 

THE PLAYS OF GERHART HAUPTMANN. 

THE SUNKEN BELL. Fcap. 8vo, boards, +s. net. 
HANNELE. Small 410, with Portrait, 5$. Paper covers, is. dd.; or 

cloth, 2S. dd. 

LONELY LIVES. Paper covers, is. dd.; or cloth, 2S. dd. 
THE WEAVERS. Paper covers, is. dd.; or cloth, 2s. dd. 

THE GHETTO. A Drama in Four Acts. Freely adapted 
from the Dutch of HFRMAN HEIJERMANS, Jun., by CHESTER BAILEY 
FERNALD. i6mo, cloth, 2$. dd. ; paper, is. (:d. 

THE PLAYS OF W. E. HENLEY AND R. L. STEVEN 
SON. Crown 8vo, cloth. An Edition of 250 copies only, IDS. dd. net, 
or separately, i6:no, cloth, 25. dd. each, or paper, is. dd. 

DEACON BRODIE I ADMIRAL GUINEA. 

BEAU AUiTIN. MACAIRE. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 19 

THE PLAYS OF HENRIK IBSEN. Uniform Edition. 
Wish Introductions by WILLIAM AKCHEK. Cloth, zs. dd.; or paper co\ers, 
is. bd. each. 



WHEN WE DEAD AWAKEN. 
JOHN GABRIEL BORKMAN. 



THE MASTER BUILDER. 
HEDDA GABLER. 



LITTLE EYOLF. 

BRAND : A Dramatic Poem in Five Acts. By HENRIK IBSEN. 

Translated in the original metres, wilh an Introduction and Notes, by 
C. H. HERFORD. Small 410, cloth, is. 6d. 

THE DRAMA : ADDRESSES. By HENRY!RVING. With 

Portrait by J. McN. WHISTLER. Second Edition. Fcap. 8vo, 3$. dd. 

THE PRINCESS MALEINE : A Drama in Five Acts 
(Translated by GERARD HARRY), and THE INTRUDER: A Drama in 
One Act. By MAURICE MAETERLINCK. With an Introduction by HALL 
CAINE, and a Portrait of the Author. Small 410, cloth, 5*. 

HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR. A Farcical 

Romance in Three Acts. By R. MARSHALL. i6mo, cloth, is. 6d.; paper, 
is. dd. 
THE PLAYS OF GILBERT MURRAY. 

CARLYON SAHIB. A Drama in Four Acts. i6mo, cloth, zs. dd. ; 

paper, is. f>d. 

ANDROMACHE. A Play in Three Acts. i6mo, cloth, zs dd. ; 
paper, is. dd. 

THE PLAYS OF ARTHUR W. PINERO. Paper covers, 

is. dd. ; or cloth, zs. dd. each. 



THE TIMES. 
THE PROFLIGATE. 
THE CABINET MINISTER. 
THE HOBBY HORSE. 
LADY BOUNTIFUL. 
THE MAGISTRATE. 
DANDY DICK. 
SWEET LAVENDER. 
THE SCHOOL-MISTRESS. 
THE WEAKER SEX. 
THE AMAZONS. 



THE NOTORIOUS MRS. EBB- 
SMITH. 

THE BENEFIT OF THE 
DOUBT. 

THE PRINCESS AND THE 
BUTTERFLY. 

TRELAWNY OF THE 
"WELLS." 

* THE SECOND MRS. TAN 
QUERAY. 



t THE GAY LORD QUEX. 
* This play can be had in Library form, 410, cloth. With a Portrait, 51. 
t A Limited Edition of this Play on Handmade Paper, with a New Por 
trait, los. net. 

THE FANTASTICKS. A Romantic Comedy in Three Acts. 
By EDMUND ROSTAND. Freely done into English Verse by GBOKGK 
FLEMING. i6mo, cloth zs. fid., paper is. dd. 

CYRANO DE BERGERAC. A Play in Five Acts. By 
EDMOND ROSTAND. Translated from the French by GLADYS THOMAS 
and MARY F. GUII.LEMARD. Small 410, $s. Also, Popular Edition, i6mo, 
cloth, zs. dd. ; paper, is. 6d. 

THE FRUITS OF ENLIGHTENMENT: A Comedy in 

Four Acts. By Count LYOF TOLSTOY. Translated from the Russian by 
E. J. DILLON. With Introduct on by A. W. PINERO. Small 410; with 
Portrait, 5$. ; Paper Covers, is. dd. 

SOME INTERESTING FALLACIES OF THE 

MODERN STAGE. An Address delivered to the Playgoers' Club at St. 
James's Hall, on Sanday, 6th December, 1891. By HKKBERT BEEKBOHM 
TREE. Crown 8vo, sewed, dd. net, 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST' 



poetn?. 

THE GARDEN OF KAMA ; and other Love Lyrics from 
India. Arranged in Verse by LAUKENCE HOPE. Square 8vu, 5$. net. 

THE POEMS OF SCHILLER. Translated into English by 
E. P. ARNOLD-FOSTER. Crown 8vo, 6s. 

POEMS. By ARTHUR SYMONS. In Two Volumes. Square 

8vo. With Photogravure Portrait, tos. net. 

IMAGES OF GOOD AND EVIL. By ARTHUR SYMONS. 

Crown 8vo, buckram, 6s. 

THE FOREST CHAPEL, and other Poems. By l\f AXWELI, 
GRAY, Aulhorof "The Silence of Dean Maitland," "The Last Sentence," 
&C. Fcap. 8vo, price 5^. 

POEMS FROM THE DIVAN OF HAFIZ. Translated 
from the Persian by GERTRUDE LOWTHIAN BELL. Small crown 8vo, 

THE POETRY OF WILFRID BLUNT. Selected and 
arranged by W. E. HENLEY and GEORGE WYNDHAM. With an Intro 
duction by W. E. HENLEY. Crown 8vo, price 6s. 

ON VIOL AND FLUTE. By EDMUND GOSSE. Fcap. 8vo, 

with Frontispiece and Tailpiece, price 3.1. 6d. net. 

FIRDAUSI IN EXILE, and other Poems. By EDMUND 

GOSSE. Fcap. 8vo, with Frontispiece, price js. 6d. net. 

IN RUSSET AND SILVER. POEMS. By EDMUND 

GOSSE. Author of " Gossip in a Library," &c. Fcap 8vo, price 3.1. 6d. net. 

THE POETRY OF PATHOS AND DELIGHT. From 

the Works of COVENTRY PATMORE. Passages selected ty ALICE MEY- 
NELL. With a Photogravure Portrait from an Oil Painting by JOHN 
SARGENT, A.R.A. Fcau. 8vo, 5^. 

A CENTURY OF GERMAN LYRICS. Translated from 
the German by KATE FREILIGRATH KROEKER. Fcan. 8vo, rough 
edges, 35. 6rf. 

LOVE SONGS OF ENGLISH POETS, 1500-1800. 

With Notes by RALPH H. CAINE. Fcap. 8vo, rough edges, 3$. dd. 
** Large Paper Edition, limited to 100 Copies, los. 6d. net. 

IN CAP AND GOWN. Three Centuries of Can bridge Wit. 
Edited by CHARLES \VHIBLEY Third Edition, with a New Introduction, 
and a Frontispiece, crown Svo, 3.1. 6d. net. 

IVY AND PASSION FLOWER: Poems. By GERARD 
BENDALL, Author of " Estelle," &c. &c. i2ino, cloth, 3.5. 6a, 

VERSES. By GERTRUDE HALL. I2mo, cloth, 35. 6./. 
IDYLLS OF WOMANHOOD. By C. AMY DAWSON. 

Fcap. Svo, gilt top, 5*. 

TENNYSON'S GRAVE. By ST. CLAIR BADDM.F.Y. 8vo, 

paper, is. 

THE BLACK RIDERS. And Other Lines. By STEPHEN 
CRANE, Author of "The Red Badge of Courage.' igmo, leather, gilt 
top, 3*. net. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 21 

jEfcucatton ant> Science; 
LITERATURES OF THE WORLD. 

A Series of Short Histories. 
Edited by EDMUND GOSSE, LL.D. 

Each Volume Large Crown 8vo, Cloth 6s. 
A HISTORY OF ANCIENT GREEK LITERATURE. 

By GILBERT MURRAY, M.A., Professor of Greek in the University 

of Glasgow. 
A HISTORY OF FRENCH LITERATURE. By EDWARD 

DOWDEN, D.C. L. , LL.D., Professor of Oratory and tnglish 

Literature in the University of Dublin. 
A HISTORY OF MODERN ENGLISH LITERATURE. 

By the EDITOR, Hon. M.A. of Trinity College, Cambridge, Hon. 

LL.D. of St. Andrews. 
A HISTORY OF ITALIAN LITERATURE. By RICHARD 

GARNETT, C.B., LL.D., Keeper of Printed Books in the British 

Museum. 
A HISTORY OF SPANISH LITERATURE. P.y J. Fnz- 

M AUR1CE-KELLY, Corresponding Member of the Spanish Academy. 
A HISTORY OF JAPANESE LITERATURE. By 

W. G. ASTON, C.M.G., D.Lit., late Japanese Secretary to H.M. 

Legation, Tokio. 
A HISTORY OF BOHEMIAN LITERATURE. By 

FRANCIS, COUNT LUTZOW. 
A HISTORY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE. By K. 

WALISZEWSKI. 
A HISTORY OF SANSKRIT LITERATURE. By 

ARTHUR A. MACDONELL, M.A., Ph.D., of Corpus Clvisti College, 

( 'xford ; Boden Professor of Sanskrit and Fellow of Halliol. 
A HISTORY OF CHINESE LITERATURE. By HERBERT 

A. GILES, M.A., LL.D., Professor of Chinese in the University 

of Cambridge. 

The following are arranged for : 

A HISTORY OF MODERN SCANDINAVIAN LITER 
ATURE. By GFORGE BRANDES, of Copenhagen. 
A HISTORY OF HUNGARIAN LITERATURE. By 

Dr. ZOLTAN BEOTHY, Professor of Hungarian Literature at the 

University of Budapest, and Secretary of the Kisfaludy Socitty. 
A HISTORY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE. By 1'ro- 

fessor W. P. TRENT. 
A HISTORY OF LATIN LITERATURE. By Dr. A. W. 

VERRALL, Fellow and Senior Tutor of Trinity College, 

Cambridge. 
A HISTORY OF PROVENQAL LITERATURE. By 

H. OELSNER, D.Litt. of Caius College, Cambridge. 
A HISTORY OF HEBREW LITERATURE. By PHILIPPE 

BERCER, of the Institute of France. 
A HISTORY OF PERSIAN LITERATURE. By Prof. 

DKNISOX Ross. 
A HISTORY OF ARABIC LITERATURE. By Prof. 

CLKMENT HUART. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



THE GREAT EDUCATORS. 

A Series of Twelve Volumes by Eminent Writers, presenting 

in their entirety "A Biographical History of Education.'* 

Each subject forms a complete volume, crown 8vo, $s. 

ARISTOTLE, and the Ancient Educational Ideals. By 
THOMAS DAVIDSON, M A., LL.D. 

LOYOLA, and the Educational System of the Jtsuits. By 
Rev. THOMAS HUGHES, S.J. 

ALCUIN, and the kise of the Christian Schools. By 
Professor ANDREW F. WEST, Ph D. 

FROEBEL, and Education by Self-Activity. By H. COURT- 
HOPE BOWEN, M.A 

ABELARD, and the Origin and Early History of Uni 
versities. By Professor JULES GABRIEL COMPAYRK. 

HERBART AND THE HERBARTIANS. By CHARLFS 
DE GARMO, Ph. I 1 . 

THOMAS AND MATTHEW ARNOLD, and their In- 
fluence on English Education. By Sir JOSHUA FITCH, M.A., LL.D. 

HORACE MANN, and the Common School Revival in 
the United States. By B. A. HINSDALE, Ph.D., LL.D. 

ROUSSEAU ; and, Education according to Nature. By 
THOMAS DAVIDSON, M.A., LL.D. 

COMENIUS. AND THE BEGINNINGS OF EDUCA 
TIONAL REFORM. By WILL. S. MONROE, A.B. 

PESTALOZZI; and the Foundation of the Modern 

Elementary School. By A. PINLOCHK, Professor in the Univer.-ity of Lille. 

STURM, AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF SECON 
DARY EDUCATION. By JAMES K. RUSSELL, Ph.D. \_lnpreparatioti. 



HEINEMANN'S SCIENTIFIC HANDBOOKS. 

THE BIOLOGICAL PROBLEM OF TO-DAY: Pie- 

formation or Epigenesis? Authorised Translation from the German of 
Prof. Dr. OSCAR HERTWIG, of the University of Berlin, By P. CHALMERS 
MITCHELL, M.A , Oxon. With a Preface by the Translator. Crown 8vo. 
3*. 6rf. 

MANUAL OF BACTERIOLOGY. By A. B. GRIFFITHS, 

Ph.D., F.R.S. (Edin.) F.C.S. Crown 8vo, c'o.h, Illustrated. 5*. 

MANUAL OF ASSAYING GOLD, SILVER, COPPER, 
TIN, AND LEAD ORES. By WALTER LEE BROWN, B.Sc. Revised, 
Corrected, and considerably Enlarged, and with chapters on the Assaying 
of Fuels, Iron and Zinc Ores, &c. By A. B. GRIFFITHS, Ph.D., F.R.S. 
(Edin.), F.C.S. Crown 8vo, cloth. Illustrated, 7*. (xt. 

GEODESY. By J. HOWARD GORE. Crown 8vo, cloth, Illus- 

THE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF GASES. By 

ARTHUR L, KIMBALL, of the Johns Hopkins University. Crown 8vo, 
cloth, Illustrated. 55. 

HEAT AS A FORM OF ENERGY. By Professor R. H, 
TIIVRSTON, ' Cornell University. Crown Svo, cloth, Illustrated, 5$, 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 23 

AN ILLUSTRATED HISTORY OF ENGLISH 

LITERATURE. Ky RICHARD GARNETT, C.B., LL.D., and EDMUND 
(jossii, M.A., LL. I>. In Four \ olumes, very fully Illustrated. 

THE FRENCH AND ENGLISH WORD BOOK. A 

Dictionary. With Indication of Pronunciation, Etymologies, and Dates 
of Earliest Ap t earance of French Words in the Language. By H. 
EDGUEN, Ph.D. and P. B. BURNET, M.A. With an Explanatory Preface 
by R. J. LLOYD, D.Litt., M.A. 8vo cloth, ios., or half-morocco, i6j. 

SEMANTICS: Studies in the Science of Meaning. By 
MICHEL BREAL, Professor of Comparative Grammar at the College de 
France. Translated by Mrs. HENRY Ci'ST. With a Preface by 
J. P. POSTGATE, Professor of Comparative Philogy atUniveisity College, 
London. Large crown 8vo, cloth js. (xl. net. 

TELEPHOTOGRAPHY. An Elementary Treatise on the 
Construction and Application of the Telephotographic Lens. By THOMAS 
R. DAI.LMEYER, F.R.A.S., Vice-President of the Royal Photographic 
Society. 410, cloth, with 26 Plates and 68 Diagrams. Price, 15^. net. 

THE PLAY OF MAN. By CARL GROOS, Professor of 

Philosophy in the University of Base!. Translated with the Author's 
co-operation by ELIZABETH L. BALDWIN, with a Preface by J. MARK 
BALDWIN, Ph.D., Hon. D.Sc. (Oxon), Professor in Princeton University. 
Crown 8vo, is. 6rt. net. 

EVOLUTIONAL ETHICS AND ANIMAL PSYCH 
OLOGY. By E. P. EVANS. Crown Svo, of. 

MOVEMENT. Translated from the French of E. MAREY. 
By ERIC PRITCHARD, M.A., M.B. Oxon. In One Volume, crown 8vo 
with 170 Illustrations, 7$. 6ii. 

LUMEN. By CAMILLE FLAMMARION. Authorised Translation 

from the French by A. A. M. and R. M. W th portions of the last 
chapter written specially for this edition. Crown 8vo, 3$. fid. 
OUTLINES OF THE EARTH'S HISTORY. A Popular 
Study in Physiography. By NATHANIEL SOUTHGATE SHALER. Svo, 
with Ten full-page Illustrations. 7^. 6</. 

THE STORY OF THE GREEKS. By H. A. GUERBER. 

Crown Svo, with Illustrations. 3$. 6rf. 

ARABIC AUTHORS: A Manual of Arabian History and 
Literature. By F. F. ARBUTHNOT, M.R.A.S., Author of " Early Ideas," 
"Persian Portraits," &c. Svo, cloth, 5.5. 

THE MYSTERIES OF CHRONOLOGY. With pro 
posal for a New English Era to be called the "Victorian." By F. F. 
ARUUTHNOT. 8vo, 6s. net. 

OLaw. 

A SHORT TREATISE OF BELGIAN LAW AND 

LEGAL PROCEDURE. From a Practical Standpoint.for the Guidanceof 
British Traders, Patentees, and Bankers, and Briti.>h Residents in Belgium. 
By GASTON DE LEVAL. Fcap. 8vo, paper, is. 6d. 

PRISONERS ON OATH, PRESENT AND FUTURE, 

By Sir HERBERT STEPHEN, Bart. Svo, boards, is. net. 
THE ARBITRATOR'S' MANUAL. Under the London 
Chamber of Arbitration. Being a Practical Treatise on the Power and 
Duties of an Arbitrator, with the Rules and Procedure of the Court of 
Arbitration, and the Forms. By JOSEPH SEYMOUR SALAMAN, Author of 
" Trade Marks," &c. Fcap. Svo, 3$. (id. 



24 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



Juvenile. 

FAIRY TALES. By HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN. Newly 

translated by H. L. BRAEKSTAD. With an Introduction by EDMUND 
GOSSE. Illustrated by HANS TEGNER. Royal 8vo, 20$. net, or in Two 
Volumes los. net each. 

FAIRY TALES FROM THE SWEDISH OF BARON 

G. DJUKKLOU. Translated by H. L. BR/EKSTAD. With Illustrations 
by T. KITTELSEN and ERIK WERENSKIOLD, and a Frontispiece by CARL 
LARSSON. 410, boards. 3.5. dd. 

THE SQUARE BOOK OF ANIMALS. By WILLIAM 

NICHOLSON With Rhymes by ARTHUR WAUGH. 410 boards, sv. 
*+* There is also a limited Edition on Japanese Vellum, ptice 121. 6t/. net. 

THE BELOVED SON. The Story of Jesus Christ, told to 
Children. By Mrs. FRANCIS RYE. i6mo. cloth, is. 6rf. 

LITTLE JOHANNES. By F. VAN EKBEN. Tran lat^l fnm 
the Uutch by CLARA BEI.L. With an Introduction by AND..EW LANG. 
i6mo, cloth, silver top, 3^. net. 

A BATTLE AND A BOY. By BLANCHE WILLIS HOWARD. 

With Thirty-nine Illustrations by A. MAcNiELL-BARBOUR Crown 8vo, 6s. 

GIRLS AND WOMEN. By E. CHESTER. Pot 8vo, cioth, 

2S. 6d., or gilt extra, 3^. fid. 

ffiction. 

BOULE DE SUIF. From the Fiench of GUY DE MAUPAS 
SANT. With an Introduction by ARTHUR SYMONS, and 56 Wood 
Engravings from Drawings by F. TIIEVENOT. Royal 8vo, boards. 500 
copies only, on Japanese vellum. 15$. net 



A CENTURY OF FRENCH ROMANCE. 

Edited by EDMUND GOSSE, LL.D. 
With Portrait- Notes by OCTAVE UZANNE. 

** A Library Edition, in 12 Volumes, demy 8vo, cloth gilt, flat backs and gilt 

top, lim.ted to 1000 Sets, price Four Guineas the Set. 

AUo separate Volumes, 7.1. kd. each. 

I. THE CHARTREUSE OF PARMA. Translated from 
the French of DE STENDHAL by the LADY MARY LOYD. With a Critical 
Introduction by MAURICE HEWLETT ; Four Coloured Plates by EUGENE 
PAUL AVRIL, Photogravure Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

a. COLOMBA AND CARMEN. Translated from the French 
of Professor MEKIMKK by the LADY MARY LOYD. With a Critical Intro 
duction by ARTHUR SYMONS; Four Coloured Plates by PARYS, Photo 
gravure Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

3. MAUPRAT. Translated from the French of GEORGE SAND 
by STANLEY YOUNG. With a Critical Introduction by JOHN O. . ER 
HOBBES ; Three Coloured Plates by EUG&NE PAUL AVKH., Photogravure 
Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 25 

4. THE BLACK TULIP. Translated from the French ol 

ALKXANDKE DUMAS, pere. With a Critical Introduction by RICHARD 
GAKNKTT, CM!., LL.D. ; Three Coloured Plates by HENRY DELASPRE, 
Photogravure 1'Vontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

5. NOTRE-DAME OF PARIS. Translated from the French 

of VICTOR HUGO. Wiih a Critical Introduction by ANDREW LANG; 
Four Coloured Plates by Louis EDOUARD FOURNIER, Photogravure 
Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

6. THE LADY OF THE CAMELLIAS. Transited from 

the French of AI.EXANDRE DUMAS, fils. With a Critical Introduction 
by EDMUND GOSSE, LL.P. ; Three Coloured Plates by GEORGES JKAN- 
NIOT, Photogravure Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

7. THE TWO YOUNG BRIDES. Translated from -he 

French of HONORE DE BALZAC. Wiih a Critical Introduction by HENRY 
JAMES ; Three Coloured Plates by EUGENE PAUL AVRIL, Photogravure 
Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

8. THE ROMANCE OF A POOR YOUNG MAN. 

Translated from the French of OCTAVE FEUILI.ET. With a Critical 
Introduction by HENRY HARLAND ; Ihree Coloured Pl.'tes by SIMONT 
GUILHEM, Photogravure Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

9. MADAME BOVARY. Translated from the French of 

GUSTAVB FLAUBERT. With a Critical Introduction by HENRY JAMES ; 
Three Coloured Plates by GEOKGES JEANNIOTT, Photogravure Frontis 
piece, and numerous small Portraits. 

io. THE NABOB. Translated from the French of ALPHONSE 
DAUUET. With a Critical Introduction by Prof. TRENT ; Three Coloured 
Plates by Louis EDOUARD FOURNIER, Photogravure Frontispiece, and 
numerous small Portraits. 



11. RENEE MAUPERIN. Translated from the French of 

JULES and EDMOND DE GONCOURT. With a Critical Introduction by 
JAMES FITZMAURICE-KELLY ; Three Coloured Plates by MICHAEL, 
Photogravure Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

12. PIERRE AND JEAN. Translated from the French of 

GUY DE MAUPASSANT. With a Critical Introduction by the EAKI. OF 
CKEWK ; Three Coloured Plates by HENRY DELASPRE, Photogravure 
Frontispiece, and numerous small Portraits. 

THE WORKS OF TOLSTOY. 

Translated from the Russian Original by 

CONSTANCE GARNETT. 

A Library Edition. Demy 8vo, price js. 6d. per Volume. 
I-II. ANNA KARENIN. In Two Volumes; with 

Photogravure Frontispiece. 
III. IVAN ILYITCH. And other Su.ries. 



26 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



popular 6s. 

BENEFITS FORGOT. By WOT.COTT BAI.ESTIER. 

A CHAMPION IN THE SEVENTIES. Jly EDITH A. 

THE GLOW-WORM. By MAY BATEMAN. 

A DAUGHTER OF THIS WORLD. By F. BATTER- 

SHALL. 

EQUALITY. By EDWARD BELLAMY, Author of "Looking 

SCARLET AND HYSSOP. By E. F. BENSON. 

THE LUCK OF THE VAILS. By E. F. BENSON. 

MAMMON & CO. By E. F. BENSON, Author of " Dodo." 

THE PRINCESS SOPHIA. By E. F. BENSON. 

GILLETTE'S MARRIAGE. By MAMIE BOWLES. 

THE AMAZING LADY. By M. BOWLES. 

THE BROOM OF THE WAR-GOD. By II. N. BRAILS- 

A SUPERFLUOUS WOMAN. By EMMA BROOKE. 
TRANSITION. By the Author of " A Superflu. us Woman." 

LIFE THE ACCUSER. By the Author of "A Supeiflu us 
Woman." 

THE ETERNAL CITY. By HALL CAINE. 

THE CHRISTIAN. By HALL CAINE. 

THE MANXMAN. By HALL CAINE. 

THE BONDMAN. A New Saga. By HALL CAINE. 

THE SCAPEGOAT. By HALL CAINE. 

THE LAKE OF WINE. By BERNARD CAPES. 

COTTAGE FOLK. By Mrs. COMYNS CARR. 

JASPAR TRISTRAM. By A. W. CLARKE. 

THE INHERITORS. By JOSEPH CONRAD and FORD M. 

HuEFFtR. 

THE NIGGER OF THE " NARCISSUS." By JOSEPH 

CONRAD. 
LAST STUDIES. By HUBERT CRACKAVTHORPE. With an 

Introduction by Mr. HENRY JAMES, and a Portrait. 

SENTIMENTAL STUDIES. By HUBERT CRACKANTHORPE. 
ACTIVE SERVICE. By ST&PHEN CRANE. 
THE THIRD VIOLET. By STEPHEN CRANE. 
THE OPEN BOAT. By STEPHEN- CRANE. 

PICTURES OF WAR. (The Red Badge of Courage, The 

Little Regiment, &c.) By STEPHEN CRANE. 
BOWERY TALES (MAGGIE AND GEORGE'S 

MOTHER). By STEPHEN CRANE. 

THE CHILD OF PLEASURE. By GABRIKLE D'AN.NUNZIO. 
THE VICTIM. By GABRIELS D'ANNUNZIO. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 2? 

iftction. popular 6s. IRovels. 

THE TRIUMPH OF DEATH. By GAHRIKI.K D'ANNUNZIO. 
THE VIRGINS OF THE ROCKS. By GABRIELE 

D'ANNUNZIO. 

THE FLAME OF LIFE. By GABRIKI.E D'ANNUNZIO. 
THE LION AND THE UNICORN AND OTHER 

STORIES. By RICHARD HARDING DAVIS. Illustrated. 

SOLDIERS OF FORTUNE. By RICHARD HARDING 

JOSEPH'KHASSAN: HALF-CASTE. By A. j. DAWSON. 

GOD'S FOUNDLING. By A. J. DAWSON. 

AFRICAN NIGHTS' ENTERTAINMENT. By A. J. 

DAWSON. 
THE STORY OF RONALD KESTREL. By A. J. 

HEARTsTlMPORTUNATE. By EVELYN DICKINSON. 

THE IMAGE BREAKERS. By GERTRUDE Dix. 

THE STORY OF A MODERN WOMAN. By ELI.A 

HEPWORTH DIXON. 
LOVE AND HIS MASK. By MENIE MURIEL DOWIE. 

SPINDLE AND PLOUGH. By Mrs. HENRY DUDENEY. 

FOLLY CORNER. By Mrs. HENRY DUDENEY. 

THE MATERNITY OF HARRIOTT WICKEN. By 

MRS. HENRY DUDENEY. 

JEM CARRUTHERS. The Extraordinary Adventures of an 
Ordinary Man. By the EARL OF EI.LESMERE (Charles Granville). 

CHINATOWN STORIES. By CHESTER BAILEY FERNALD. 
GLORIA MUNDI. By HAROLD FREDERIC. 
ILLUMINATION. By HAROLD FREDERIC. 
THE MARKET PLACE. By HAROLD FREDERIC. 
THE EAGLE'S HEART. By HAMLIN GARLAND 
PETERSBURG TALES. By OLIVE GARNETT. 
SAWDUST. By DOROTHEA GERARD. 
THE COURTESY DAME. By R. MURRAY GILCHRIST. 
THE VOICE OF THE PEOPLE. By ELLEN GLASGOW. 
PHASES OF AN INFERIOR PLANET. By ELLEN 

THE BETH BOOK. By SARAH GRAND. 

THE HEAVENLY TWINS. By SARAH GRAND. 

IDEALA. By SARAH GRAND. 

OUR MANIFOLD NATURE. By SARAH GRAND. With 

a Portrait of the Author. 

THIRTEEN STORIES. By R. B. CUNNINGHAME GRAHAM. 

THE WHITE TERROR: a Romance of the French Revo 
lution and After. By FELIX GRAS. 

THE TERROR; a Romance of the French Revolution. 
By fEi.ix GRAS. 



28 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



fiction. popular 6s. Ittords. 

FOUR-LEAVED CLOVER. By MAXWELL GRAY. 

THE WORLD'S MERCY AND OTHER TALES. By 

MAXWELL GRAY. 
THE HOUSE OF HIDDEN TREASURE. By MAX- 

T H B LA ST V S E N T E N C E. By MAXWELL G RAY. 
SWEETHEARTS AND FRIENDS. By MAXWELL GRAY. 
THE FREEDOM OF HENRY MEREDYTH. By M. 

McLE A OD T< OF THE CAMERONS. By M. HAMILTON. 

A SELF-DENYING ORDINANCE. By M. HAMILTON. 

THE HIDDEN MODEL. By FRANCES HARROD. 

THE SLAVE. By ROBERT HICHENS. 

THE LONDONERS: An Absurdity. By ROBERT HICHENS. 

FLAMES. By ROBERT HICHENS. 

THE FOLLY OF EUSTACE. By ROBERT HICHENS. 

AN IMAGINATIVE MAN. By ROBERT HICHENS. 

THE VALLEY OF THE GREAT SHADOW. By 

ANNIE E. HOLDSWORTH. 

THE GODS ARRIVE. By ANNIE E. HOLDSWORTH. 
THE YEARS THAT THE LOCUST HATH EATEN. 

By ANNIE E. HOLDSWORTH. 

THE TWO MAGICS. By HENRY JAMES. 

WHAT MAISIE KNEW. By HENRY JAMES. 

THE OTHER HOUSE. By HENRY JAMES. 

THE SPOILS OF POYNTON. By HENRY JAMES. 

EMBARRASSMENTS. By HENRY JAMES. 

TERMINATIONS. By HENRY JAMES. 

THE AWKWARD AGE. By HENRY JAMES. 

ON THE EDGE OF THE EMPIRE. By EDGAR JEPSON 
and CAPTAIN D. BEAMES. 

HERBERT VANLENNERT. By C. F. KEARY. 

FROM A SWEDISH HOMESTEAD. By SELMA LAGER- 
LOP. Translated by JESSIE BR6CHNER. 

THE FALL OF LORD PADDOCKSLEA. By LIONEL 

IN HASTE' AND AT LEISURE. By Mrs. LYNN LINTON, 

Author of " Joshua Davidson," &c. 

AT THE GATE OF SAMARIA. By W. J. LOCKE. 
SOME WOMEN I HAVE KNOWN. By MAARTEN* 

MAARTENS. 

IF I WERE KING. By JUSTIN H. MCCARTHY. 
RELICS. Fmgments of a Life. By FRANCES MACNAB. 
A DAUGHTER OF THE VELDT. By BASIL MARNAN. 
A PROPHET OF THE REAL. By ESTHER MILLER. 
LIFE AT TWENTY. F,v CHARLES RUSSELL MORSE. 
THE DRONES MUST DIE. By MAX NORDAU. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 29 



fiction. popular 6s. 

THE MALADY OF THE CENTURY. By MAX NORDAU. 
A COMEDY OF SENTIMENT. By MAX NORDAU. 
MARIETTA'S MARRIAGE. By W. E. NORRIS. 
THE DANCER IN YELLOW. By W. E. NORRIS. 
A VICTIM OF GOOD LUCK. By W. E. NORRIS. 
THE COUNTESS RADNA. By W. E. NORKIS. 
THE WIDOWER. By W. E. NORRIS. 
THE LION'S BROOD. By DUFFIELD OSBORNE. 
THE QUEEN VERSUS BILLY, AND OTHER 
STORI ES. By LI.OVD OSBOURNE. 

RED ROCK. By THOMAS NELSON PAGE. Illustrated. 
THE RIGHT OF WAY. By GILBERT PARKER. 

THE LANE THAT HAD NO TURNING. By GILBERT 
PARKER. 

EZEKIEL'S SIN. Bv J. II. PEARCE. 

A PASTORAL PLAYED OUT. By M. L. PENDKRED. 

AS IN A LOOKING GLASS. By F. C. PHILIPS. With 

Illustrations by Du MAURIER. 

THE SCOURGE-STICK. By Mrs. CAMPBELL I RAI-.D. 

FOREST FOLK. By JAMES PRIOR. 

WITHOUT SIN. By MARTIN J. PRITCHARD. 

VOYSEY. By RICHARD O. PROWSE. 

KING CIRCUMSTANCE. By EDWIN PUGII. 

THE MAN OF STRAW. By EDWIN PUGII. 

TONY DRUM. A Cockney B >y. Bv EDWIN PUGH. With 

Ten full-pasre Illustrations by the BEGGAKSTAFF BROTHERS. 

CHUN-TJ-KUNG. By CLAUDE KEES. 

BELOW THE SALT. By ELIZABETH ROBINS (C. E. KAI- 

MOND). 

THE OPEN QUESTION. By ELIZABETH ROBINS. 
CHIMERA. By F. MABFL ROBINSON. 

THE DULL MISS ARCHINARD. By ANNE DOUGLAS 

SEUGWICK. 
THE CONFOUNDING OF CAMELIA. By ANNE 

DOUGLAS SEPG\VICK. 

THE LAND OF COCKAYNE. By MATILDE SERAO. 
THE BALLET DANCER AND ON GUARD. BY MATILDE 

SERAO. 

THE FAILURE OF SIBYL FLETCHER. By ADELINE 

SKKC.EANT. 

OUT OF DUE SEASON. By ADELINE SERGEANT. 
THE LADY OF DREAMS. By UNA L. SILBERRAD. 



30 MR. HEINEMANWS LIST. 



fiction. popular 6s. H-lovcls, 

THE RAPIN. By H. PE VERB STACPOOT.E. 

THE HOSTS OF THE LORD. By FLORA ANNIB 

VOICES IN THE NIGHT. By FLORA ANNIE STEEL. 
ON THE FACE OF THE WATERS. By FLORA ANNIK 

STEEL. 

THE POTTER'S THUMB. By FLOIJA ANNIE STEEL. 
FROM THE FIVE RIVERS. By FLORA ANNIE STEEL. 
IN THE PERMANENT WAY. By FLORA ANNIE STSEL. 
RED ROWANS. Bv FLORA ANNIE !~TEEL. 
THE FLOWER OF FORGIVENESS. By FLORA ANNIE 

MISS STUART'S LEGACY. By FLORA ANNIE STEEL. 
THE MINISTER OF STATE. By J. A. SIEUART. 
THE EBB-TIDE. By ROBERT Louis STEVENSON and LLOYD 

OSBOURNE 

MYSTERY OF THE SEA. By BR AM STOKER. 

THE ELEVENTH COMMANDMENT. By HALLIWELL 

SUTCLIFFE. 

NUDE SOULS. By BENJAMIN SWIFT. 

A COURT INTRIGUE. By BASIL THOMSON. 

VIA LUCIS. By KASSANDRA VIVARIA. 

JACK RAYMOND. By E. L. VOYNICII. 

THE GADFLY. By E. L. VOYNICH. 

THE REBEL. Being a Memoir of Anthony, Fourth Earl of 
Cherwell. including an account of the Rising at Taunton in 1634. Com 
piled and set forth by his Cousin Sir HILARY MACE, Bart., Gustos 
Kotulorum for the County of Wilts. Edited, with some Notes, by H. B. 
MARRIOTT WATSON. 

THE WAR OF THE WORLDS. By H. G. WELLS. 

THE ISLAND OF DOCTOR MOREAU. By H. G. WELLS. 

CORRUPTION. By PERCY WHITE. 

MR. BAILEY-MARTIN. By PERCY WHITE. With Portrait. 

TANGLED TRINITIES. By DANIEL WOODROFFE. 

SONS OF THE SWORD. A Romance of the Peninsular 
War. By MARGARET L. WOODS. 

THE STORY OF EDEN. By DOLF WYLLARDE. 
THE MANTLE OF ELIJAH. By I. ZANGWILL. 
THEY THAT WALK IN DARKNESS. By I. ZANGWILL. 
THE MASTER. By I. ZANGWILL. With Portrait. 
CHILDREN OF THE GHETTO. By I. ZANGWILL. 
THE PREMIER AND THE PAINTER. A Fantastic 

Romance. By I. ZANGWILL and Louis COWEN. 
DREAMERS OF THE GHETTO. By I. ZANGWILL 
THE KING OF SCHNORRERS, GROTESQUES AND 

FANTASIES. By I. ZANGWILL. With Ninety-eight Illustrations. 

THE CELIBATES' CLUB. By I. ZANGWILL. 
WITHOUT PREJUDICE. By I. ZANGWILL. 
CLEO THE MAGNIFICENT. By Z. Z. 
THE WORLD AND A MAN. By Z. Z. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 31 

tfictiou. popular 5s. Iflovels. 

THE SECRET OF NARCISSE. By EDMUND GOSSE. 

Crown 8vo, buckram. 

THE ATTACK ON THE MILL. By EMILE ZOLA. With 

Twenty-one Illustrations, and Five exquisitely printed Coloured Plates, 
from Original Drawings by E. COURBOIN. In On Volume, 410. 

fiction. popular 4s. novels. 

THE DOLLAR LIBRARY OF AMERICAN 
FICTION. 

THE GIRL AT THE HALFWAY HOUSE. By E. 

PARLOUS TIMES. By DAVID DWIGHT WELLS. 

LORDS OF THE NORTH. By AGNES C. LAUT. 

THE CHRONIC LOAFER. By NELSON LLOYD. 

HER MOUNTAIN LOVER. By UAMLIN GARLAND. 

SISTER CARRIE. By THEODORE DRKISEK. 

THE DARLINGTONS. By E. E. PEAKE. 

THE DIARY OF A FRESHMAN. By C. M. FLANDRAU. 

A DRONE AND A DREAMER. By NELSON LLOYD. 

IN OLE VIRGINIA. By THOMAS NELSON PAGE. 

THE BELEAGUERED FOREST. By ELIA W. PRAITIE. 

THE GREAT GOD SUCCESS. By JOHN GRAHAM. 

tfictfon.- popular 3s. 60. IRovels. 

MAMMON. A Novel. By Mrs. ALEXANDER. 

LOS CERRITOS. By GEPTUUDE FRANKLIN ATHERTON. 

THE AVERAGE WOMAN. By WOLCOTT BALESTIKR. 

With an Introduction by HENRY JAMES. 
THE JUSTIFICATION OK ANDREW LEBRUN. By 

F. BARRETT. 
PERCHANCE TO DREAM, and other Stories. By MAR 

GARET S. BRISCOE. 
CAPT'N DAVY'S HONEYMOON, The Blind Mother, 

and The Last Comession. By HALL CAINE. 
A MARKED MAN. By ADA CAMBRIDGE. 
A LITTLE MINX. By ADA CAMBRIDGE. 
A CONSPIRACY OF SILENCE. By G. COI.MORE. 
A DAUGHTER OF MUSIC. By G. COI.MORE. 
BLESSED ARE THE POOR. By FRANCOIS COPI-*E. 

With an Introduction by T. P. O'CONNOR. 

WRECKAGE, and other Stories. By HUBERT CRACKAN- 



JACKAL. By RICHARD HARDING DAVIS. 

With Four Illustrations by CHAKLHS DANA GIBSON. 



32 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 



fiction. popular 3s. 6fc. 1Hov>els. 

IN SUMMER ISLES. By BURTON DIBBS. 

THE OUTSPAN. Tales of South Africa. By J. PERCY 

FlTZPATRICK. 

THE COPPERHEAD ; and other Stories of the North 
during the American War. By HAROLU FREDERIC. 

THE RETURN OF THE O'MAHONY. By HAROLD 

FREDERIC. With Illustrations. 

IN THE VALLEY. By HAROLD FREDERIC. With Illus- 

(rations. 

THE ORLOFF COUPLE AND MALVA. By ALEXEI 
MAXIMOVITCH PESHKOFF, MAXIM GORKI. Authorised Translation from 
the Russian by EMILY JAKOWLEFF and DORA B. MONTEFIORE. \Vith a 
Portrait. 

MRS. JOHN FOSTER. By CHARLES GRANVILLE. 

MADEMOISELLE MISS, and other Stories. By HENRY 

HARLAND. 

APPASSIONATA : A Musician's Story. By ELSA D'STERRE 

KEELING. 
A MARRIAGE IN CHINA. By MRS. ARCHIBALD LITTLE. 

WRECKERS AND METHODISTS. Cornish Stories. By 

H. D. LOWRY. 

A QUESTION OF TASTE. By MAARTEN MAARTENS. 
HER OWN FOLK. (En Famille ) Bv HECTOR MAI.OT, 

Author of " No Relations." Translated by Lady MARY LOYD 

A ROMANCE OF THE CAPE FRONTIER. By BERTRAM 

MlTFORD. 

'TWEEN SNOW AND FIRE. A Tale of the Kafir Wa- of 
1877. By BERTRAM MITFORD. 

ELI'S DAUGHTER. By J. H. PEARCE. 
INCONSEQUENT LIVES. A Village Chronicle. By J. U. 

THE MASTER OF THE MAGICIANS. By ELIZAUETH 

STUART PHELPS and HERBERT D. WARD. 
ACCORDING TO ST. JOHN. By AM^LIE RIVES. 
THE STORY OF A PENITENT SOUL. Being the 

Private Papers of Mr. Stephen Dart, late Minister at Lynnbridge, in the 

County of Lincoln. By ADELINE SERGEANT. 

A KNIGHT OF THE WHITE FEATHER. By TASMA. 
UNCLE PIPER OF PIPER'S HILL. By TASMA. 
THE BLACK TORTOISE. By FREDERICK VILLER. 
HER LADYSHIP'S ELEPHANT. By DAVID DVVIGHT 

WELLS. 

HIS LORDSHIP'S LEOPARD. By DAVID DWIGHT WELLS. 
AVENGED ON SOCIETY. By H. F. WOOD. 
STORIES FOR NINON. By EMILE ZOLA. With a Portrait 

by WILL ROTHENSTEIN. 
THE ATTACK ON THE MILL, and other Sketches 

of War. By EMILE ZOLA. With an Essay on the short stories of M, 

Zola, by EDMUND GOSSE. 



MR. IIEINEMANN'S LIST. 33 



ffictfon. Tbeinemann's Snternattonal xtbrarg. 

New Review. " If you have any pernicious remnants of literary chauvinism 
I hope it will not survive the series of foreign classics of which Mr. William 
Hcinemann, aided by Mr. Edmund Gosse is publishing translations to the great 
contentment of all lovers of literature." 

Each Volume has an Introduction specially written by the Editor, 

MR. EDMUND GOSSE. 

Cloth, 33. 6d.; Paper Covers, 2s. 6d. 

IN GOD'S WAY. From the Norwegian of BJORNSTJERNE 

BjORNSON. 

THE HERITAGE OF THE KURTS. From the Norwegian 

of BJORNSTJERNE BjORNSON. 

FOOTSTEPS OF FATE. From the Dutch of Louis 

COUPERUS. 

WOMAN'S FOLLY. From the Italian of GEMMA FERRUGGIA. 

THE CHIEF JUSTICE. From the German of KARL EMIL 
FRANZOS, Author of "For the Right," &c. 

THE OLD ADAM AND THE NEW EVE. From the 
German of RUDOLF GOLM. 

A COMMON STORY. From the Russian of IVAN GONT- 

CHAROFF. 

SIREN VOICES (NIELS LYHNE). From the Danish of 
J. P. JACOBSEN. 

THE JEW. From the Polish of JOSEPH IGNATIUS KRASZKWSKI. 

THE COMMODORE'S DAUGHTERS. From the Nor 
wegian of JONAS LIE. 

NIOBE. From the Norwegian of JONAS LIE. 

PIERRE AND JEAN. From the French of GUY DE MAU 
PASSANT. 

FROTH. From the Spanish of Don ARMANDO PALACIO- 

VALDES. 

FAREWELL LOVE ! From the Italian of MATILDE SERAO. 
FANTASY. From the Italian of MATILDE SERAO. 

WORK WHILE YE HAVE THE LIGHT. From the 

Russian of Count LEO TOLSTOY. 

PEPITA JIMENEZ. From the Spanish of JUAN VALERA. 

DONA LUZ. From the Spanish of JUAN VALERA. 

UNDER THE YOKE. From the Bulgarian of IVAN VAZOFF 



34 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 

fiction. Ube pioneer Series* 

Cloth, 33. net. ; Paper Covers, zs. 6d. net. 

The Athenifum. " If this series keeps up to the present high Irvel of interest, 
novel readers will have fresh cause for gratitude to Mr. Heinem inn." 

The Daily Telegraph. "Mr. Heinemann's genial nursery of up-to-date 
romance." 

The Observer. " The smart Pioneer Series." 

The Manchester Courier. " The Pioneer Series promises to be as original as 
many other of Mr. Heinemann's ventures." 

The Glasgow Herald. "This very clever series." 

The Sheffield Telegraph. "The refreshingly original Pioneer Series." 

Black and White. " The brilliant Pioneer Series." 

The Liverpool Mercury. " Each succeeding issue of the Pioneer Series has 
a character of its own and a special attractiveness." 

PAPIER MACHE. By CHARLES AI.LEN. 
THE NEW VIRTUE. By Mis. OSCAR BERINGER. 
YEKL. A Tale of the New York Ghetto. By A. CAHAN. 
LOVE FOR A KEY. By G. COLMORE. 
HER OWN DEVICES. By C. G. COMPTON. 
MILLY'S STORY. By Mr?. MONTAGUE CRACKANTHORPE. 
THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE. By STEPHEN CRANE. 
THE LITTLE REGIMENT. By STEPHEN CRANE. 
A MAN WITH A MAID. By Mrs HENRY DUDENEY. 
LITTLE BOB. By GYP. 

ACROSS AN ULSTER BOG. By M. HAMILTON. 
THE GREEN CARNATION. By ROBERT HICHENS. 

JOANNA TRAILL, SPINSTER. By ANNIE E. HOLDS- 
WORTH. 

THE DEMAGOGUE AND LADY PHAYRE. By 

WILLIAM J. I.OCKE. 

AN ALTAR OF EARTH. By THYMOL MONK. 

A STREET IN SUBURBIA. By E. W. PUGH. 

THE NEW MOON. By ELIZABETH ROBINS (C.E. RAIMOND) 

GEORGE MANDEVILLE'S HtJSBAND. Fy ELIZABETH 

ROBINS (C. E. RAIMONU). 

DARTNELL: A Bizarre Incident. By BENJAMIN SWIFT. 
THE WINGS OF ICARUS. By LAURENCE ALMA-TADEMA. 
ONE OF GOD'S DILEMMAS. By ALLEN UPWARD. 



MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 35 

jfictfon. price 3s. net. 

THE NOVELS OF BJORNSTJERNE BJORNSON. 

Uniform Edition. Edited by EDMUND GOSSE. Fcap. 8vo, cloth, 3*. net. 
each volume. / 

I. SYNNOVE SOLBAKKEN. With Introductory 

Essay by EDMUND GOSSE, and a Portrait of the Author. 
II. ARNE. 

III. A HAPPY BOY. 

IV. THE FISHER LASS. 

V. THE BRIDAL MARCH, AND A DAY. 
VI. MAGNHILD, AND DUST. 
VII. CAPTAIN MANSANA, AND MOTHER'S 

HANDS. 
VIII. ABSALOM'S HAIR, AND A PAINFUL 

MEMORY. 

THE NOVELS OF IVAN TURGENEV. Uniform Edi- 
tion. Translated by CONSTANCE GARNETT. Fcap. 8vo, cloth, 31. net. 
each volume, or The Set of 15 Volumes 2 is. net. 

The A thentrum. " Mrs. Garnett deserves the heartiest thanks of her country 
men and countrywomen for putting before them in an English dress the splendid 
creations of the great Russian novelist. Her versions are both faithful and 
spirited : we have tes'ed them many times." 

I. RUDIN. With a Portrait of the Author and an 

Introduction by STEPNIAK. 

II. A HOUSE OF GENTLEFOLK. 

III. ON THE EVE. 

IV. FATHERS AND CHILDREN. 
V. SMOKE. 

VI., VII. VIRGIN SOIL. 
VIII., IX. A SPORTSMAN'S SKETCHES. 
X. DREAM TALES AND PROSE POEMS. 
XI. THE TORRENTS OF SPRING, &c. 
XII. A LEAR OF THE STEPPES, &c. 

XIII. THE DIARY OF A SUPERFLUOUS MAN.&c. 

XIV. A DESPERATE CHARACTER, &c. 
XV. THE JEW, &c. 

popular 2s. 6&* IKovels. 

IN THE FOG. By RICHARD HARDING DAVIS. 
THE CHRISTIAN. By HALL CAINE. Paper covers. 
THE DOMINANT SEVENTH: A Musical Story. By 

KATE ELIZABETH CLARKE. 
THE TIME MACHINE. By H. G. WELLS. 

** Also in paper, is. 6d. 

NOVELETTES DE LUXE. 
WHILE CHARLIE WAS AWAY. By MRS. POULTNEY 

THE JIG GARDEN OF CONTENTMENT. By ELENOR 

MORDAUNT. 

price 2s. 

MAGGIE. By STEPHEN CRANE. 



36 MR. HEINEMANN'S LIST. 

Ibetnemann's IRovel Xibrarp. 

Price is. 6d. net. 

THE KING OF THE MOUNTAINS. By EDMOND ABOUT. 
THE FOURTH NAPOLEON. By CHARLES BENHAM. 
COME LIVE WITH ME AND BE MY LOVE. By 

ROBERT BUCHANAN. 

THE THREE MISS KINGS. By ADA CAMBRIDGE. 
NOT ALL IN VAIN. By ADA CAMBRIDGE. 
MR. BLAKE OF NEWMARKET. By E. H. COOPER. 
A COMEDY OF MASKS. By ERNEST DOWSON and 

ARTHUR MOORE 
A PINCHBECK GODDESS. By Mrs. FLEMING (ALICE M. 

KIPLING). 
ORIOLE'S DAUGHTER. By JESSIE FOTHERGILL. 

THE TENOR AND THE BOY. By SARAH GRAND. 

THE REDS OF THE MIDI. By FELIX GRAS. 

NOR WIFE NOR MAID. By MRS. HUNGERFORD. 

THE HOYDEN. By MRS. HUNGERFORD. 

THE O'CONNORS OF BALLINAHINCH. By MRS. 

HUNGERFORD. 
THE RECIPE FOR DIAMONDS. By C. J. CUTCLIFFE 

HYNE. 
IN THE DWELLINGS OF SILENCE. A Romance 

of Russia. By WALKER KENNEDY. 

DAUGHTERS OF MEN. By HANNAH LYNCH. 
A ROMANCE OF THE FIRST CONSUL. By MATILDA 

MALLING. 

THE TOWER OF TADDEO. By OUIDA. 
THE GRANDEE. By A. PALACIO-VALDES. 
DONALD MARCY. By ELIZABETH STUART PHELPS. 
THE HEAD OF THE FIRM. By MRS. RIDDELL. 
LOU. By BARON VON ROBERTS. 
THE SURRENDER OF MARGARET BELLARMINE. 

By ADELINE SERGEANT. 

ST. IVES. By ROBERT Louis STEVENSON. 

THE PENANCE OF PORTIA JAMES. By TASMA. 

MISS GRACE OF ALL SOULS. By W. E. TIREBUCK. 

ANDREA. By PERCY WHITE. 

A DRAMA IN DUTCH. By Z. Z. 



JEMtfon. 

THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE. By STEPHEN 
CRANE. Paper covers, with design by R. CATON WOODVILLE. 

LONDON : WILLIAM HEINEMANN, 21 BEDFORD STREET, W.C, 



3n&cy of Hut bora. 



PAGE 


PAGE 


PAGE 


PAGE 


About ... 36 


Cahan ... 34 


Dowden . . 21 


Griffiths . . 22 


Alderson . . 12 


Caine (Hall) 10, 26 


Dowie . . 27 


Groos ... 23 


Alexander . . 31 


3 1 - 35 


Dowson . . 36 


Guerber . . 23 


Allan ... 13 


Caine (R.). . 20 


Dreiser . . 31 


Gusman . . 3 


Allen ... 34 


Cambridge 31, 36 


Dubois ... 13 


Guyau . . . 16 


Andersen . . 24 


Capes ... 26 


Dudeney . 27, 34 


Gyp. ... 34 


Ansorge . . 13 


Carr. ... 26 


Dumas . . 25 


Hafiz ... 20 


Anstey . . . 18 


Chambers . . 18 


Du Toil . . 13 


Hall. ... 20 


Arbuthnot . 23 


Chester . . 24 


Edgren . . 23 


Hamilton . 28, 34 


Archer ... 13 


Chevrillon. . 13 


Edwards . . 18 


Hammar . . 13 


Armstrong . i 


Clarke ( A. W.) 26 


Eeden ... 24 


Hariand . . 32 


Aston ... 21 


Clarke (K. E.) 35 


Ellesmere . . 27 


Harrod . . 28 


Atherton . . 31 


Cobbold . . 12 


Ellwanger . . 17 


Hassall . . 9 


Baddeley . 10, 20 


Coleridge . 5, 15 


Evans . . 3, 23 


Hauptmann . 18 


Baden- Powell 12 


Colmore . 31, 34 


Fernald . . 27 


Heaton . . 3 


Balestier . 26, 31 


Colomb . . 16 


Ferruggia . . 33 


Heijermans . 18 


Balzac ... 25 


Colqi:houn . ii 


Fersen . . 4 


Heine . . 7, 16 


Barnett. . . 26 


Compayre' . . 22 


Feuillet . . 25 


Helm ... 15 


Barrett ... 31 


Compton . . 34 


Fitch ... 22 


Helmolt . . 9 


Bateman . . 26 


Conrad ... 26 


Fitzmaurice- 


Henley. . . 18 


Battershall . 26 


Cook ... 12 


Kelly . 9, 21 


Hertwig . . 22 


Beames. . . 28 


Cooper. . . 36 


FitzPatrick n, 32 


Heussey . . 6 


Behrs ... 7 


Coppe'e . . 31 


Flandrau . . 31 


Hichens . 28, 34 


Bell .... ii 


Couperus . . 33 


Fleming . . 36 


Hill. ... 6 


Bellamy . , 26 


Crackanthorpe 


Flammarion . 23 


Hinde ... 13 


Bendall . . 20 


26, 31 


Flaubert . . 25 


Hinsdale . . 22 


Benedetti . . 10 


Crackanthorpe 


Forbes (A.) . 16 


Hirsch . . . 16 


Benham . . 36 


(Mrs.) . . y. 


Forbes (H.O.) 9 


Hogarth . . 8 


Benson (A. C. ) 15 


Crane 20, 26, 31, 


Fothergill . . 36 


Holdich . . 9 


Benson (E. F.) 26 


34- 35- 36 


Franzos . . 33 


Holdsworth 28, 34 


Benson (M.) . 14 


Dallmeyer . . 23 


Frederic . 27, 32 


Hope ... 20 


Beothy ... 21 


D'Annunzio 


Fried . . 7 


Hough ... 31 


Berger ... 21 


18,26, 27 


FurtwangLr . 3 


Howard . . 24 


Beringer . . 34 


D'Argenson . 4 


Gardiner . . 17 


Howells . . 12 


Bigelow (P.) . 10 


Daudet . . 25 


Garland . 27, 31 


Huart ... 21 


Bigelow (Mrs.) 35 


Davidson . . 22 


Garmo . . . 22 


Hughes . . 22 


Bismarck . . 5 


Davis 13, 27,31.35 


Garnett (O. ) . 27 


Hugo . . 5, 25 


Bjornson . 33, 35 


Dawson (C. A. ) 20 


Garnett (R.) 


Hume ... 9 


Blanch an . . 17 


Dawson(A. J.) 27 


14, 21, 23 


Hungerford . 36 


Bleloch . . ii 


De Bernis . . 4 


Gerard ... 27 


Hyne ... 36 


Blunt ... 20 


De Bourdeille 4 


Gaulot ... 8 


Ibsen ... 19 


Bourgogno . c 


De Broglie . n 


Gilchrist . . 27 


Ingersoll . . 14 


Rowen ... 22 


Decle ... 12 


Giles ... 21 


Irving (H. B.) 6 


Bowles ... 26 


De Goncourt 6, 25 


Glasgow . . 27 


Irving (Sir H.) 19 


Boyesen . . 15 


De Joinville . 7 


Golm ... 33 


Jacobsen . . 33 


Brailsford . . 26 


De Lespinasse 4 


Gonteharoff . 33 


Jaeger ... 7 


Brandes . 15, 21 


De Leval . . 23 


Gore . . . 22 


James (Henry) 


Branner . . 9 


De Ligne . . 4 


Gorki ... 32 


12, 28 


Breal ... 23 


De Loup . . 17 


Gosse 5,7,15,18, 


James (Lionel) 


Briscoe . . . 31 


De Motteviile 4 


20, 21, 23, 31 


13 


Brooke ... 26 


De Quincey 5, 15 


Gourod . . 6 


Jepson ... 28 


Brown ... 10 


De Stendhal . 24 


Graham (C.) 


Keary (E. M.) 3 


Brown&Griffiths 22 


Dibbs ... 32 


J 3. 2 7 


Keary (C. F.) 28 


Buchanan 18, 36 


Dickinson . . 27 


Graham (J. ) . 31 


Keeling . 32 


Bun y an . . 3 


Dix .... 27 


Grand . . 27, 36 


Keltie . . 8 


Burgess . . 7 


Dixon ... 27 


Granville . . 32 


Kennedy . 36 


Burnett. . . 23 


Djurklou . . 24 


Gras. . . 27, 36 


Kimball . 22 


Buttery . . . 1 1 


Donne ... $ t 


, Gray (Maxwell) 


Kipling . a 


Eyrtm ... 16 


Dooley ... 17 


20, 28 


Kirk . . 13 



Of BlltbOrS (continue^. 



PAGE 


PAGE 


PAGE 


PAGE 


Knight. . . 18 


Mockler- 


Reclus ... 8 


Thomson . . 14 


Kraszewski . 33 


Ferryman 10 


Rees ... 29 


Thomson (Basil) 30 


Kroeker . . 20 


Monk ... 34 


Rembrandt . 2 


Thurston . . 22 


Kropotk'n . 9 


Monkhousc . 2 


Renan . . 6, 16 


Tirebuck . . 36 


Lagerlof . . 28 


Monroe . . 22 


Ricci ... 2 


Tolstoy 


Landor . n, 12 


Moore ... 36 


Richter . . 17 


i?. 19, 25, 33 


Langton . . 28 


Mordaunt . 35 


Kiddell. . . 36 


Tree ... 19 


Laughton . . 5 


Morse ... 28 


Rives ... 32 


Trent ... 21 


Laut ... 31 


Miiller(F.C.G.)n 


Roberts (Baron 


Turgenev . . 3-; 


Lawson . . 3 


Muller (Iwan) n 


von) ... 36 


Underhill . . 12 


Le Caron . . 7 


Miintz ... 2 


Roberts 


Upward . . 34 


Leland ... 6 


Murray (D.C.) 16 


(C. G. D.) 14 


Valera ... 33 


Le Querdec . 7 


Murray (G.) 19, 21 


Robins ... 6 


Vandam . . 10 


Leroy-Beaulieu 


Napoleon . . 5 


Robins (Eliza 


Vazoff ... 33 


IO, II 


Nicholson . . i, 2 


beth) . . 29,34 


V. B. ... 14 


Lewis ... ii 


Nordau 16, 28, 29 


Robinson . . 29 


Verestchngin . ii 


Lie .... 33 


Norman . . n 


Ross ... 21 


Verrall ...21 


Linton ... 28 


Morris . . 29 


Rostand . . 19 


Viller ... 32 


Lloyd ... 31 


Nugent . . 5 


Russell (I. C.) 9 


Vincent . . 13 


Little (A.) 9, 12 


Oelsner . . 21 


Russell (J. E. ) 22 


Vivaria. . . 30 


Little (Mrs. A.) 


Oliphant . . 18 


Rye .... 24 


Vivienne . . 13 


32 


Osborne . . 29 


Saintsbury . 15 


Voynich . . 30 


Locke . . 28, 34 


Osb :mrn ; . . 29 


St. Simon . . 4 


Vuillier . . 3 


Lowe . . 6, 16 


Oswell ... 5 


Salaman (J. S. ) 23 


Wagner . . 16 


Lowry ... 32 


Ouida ... 36 


Salaman (M. C.) 


Waliszewski 


Lutzow (Count) 21 


Page . . 29,31 


18 


6, 8, 21 


Lynch ... 36 


Paget . . . 5 


Sand ... 24 


Walker. . . 7 


Maartens . 28, 32 


Palacio-Valdes 


Sarcey ... 7 


Ward ... 32 


McCabe . . n 


33. 3 6 


Schiller . . 20 


Warner . . 12 


McCarthy . 28 


Palatine (Prin 


Schulz ... 13 


Waters . . 17 


Macdonell . 21 


cess) . . . 4 


Scidmore . . 14 


Watson . . 30 


McFall. . . 13 


Parker ... 29 


Scoble ... ii 


Waugh . . 8 


McHugh . . 17 


Partsch . . 8 


Scudamore . 16 


Weitemever . 10 


Mackinder . 8 


Pa<?olini . . 6 


Sedgwick . . 29 


Wells(D.'D.) 31,32 


Macnab . . 28 


Paterson . . 15 


Seignobos . . ic 


Wells (H.G.) ' 


Madame Elisa 


Patmoie . . 20 


Serao . . 29, 33 


30-35 


beth ... 4 


Peake ... 31 


Sergeant 29, 32, 36 


West . . x 22 


Maeterlinck . 19 


Pearce . . 29, 32 


ShalT ... 23 


Whibley . 7, 20 


Mailing . . 36 


Peattie . . 31 


Sheldon . . 16 


White . . 30, 36 


Malot ... 32 


Pendered . . 29 


Silberrad . . 29 


White (A.) . 10 


Marey ... 23 


Pennell . . 10 


Somerset . . 14 


Whitman . . ii 


Markham . . 8 


Perry ... 7 


Stacpoole . . 30 


Wickhoff . . 2 


Marnan . . 28 


Phelps . . 32, 36 


Steel . . 17, 30 


Wilken . . ic 


Marshall . . 19 


Philips ... 29 


Stephen . . 23 


Wilkinson . . 5 


Ma->son . . 8 


Pirero . . 18, 19 


Steuar: ... 30 


Williams . . 12 


Maude . . . 16 


Pinloche . . 22 


Stevenson 18,30,36 


Wilson ... 1 6 


Maupassant 


Praed ... 29 


Stoker ... 30 


Wood ... 32 


24. 25, 33 


Pressens . . 6 


Sutcliffe . . 30 


Woodroffe . 30 


Maurice . . 16 


Prior ... 29 


Swift . 15, 30, 34 


Woods . . 30 


Merriman . . 18 


Pritchard . . 29 


Symons . 15, 20 


Wyckoff . . 12 


Merim^e . . 24 


Prowse . . 29 


Tadema . . 34 


Wyllarde . . 3 C ^, 


Michel ... 2 


Push . . 29, 34 


Tallentyre. . 18 


Wyndham . i: 


Mieville . . 14 


Puliga ... 6 


Tasma . . 32, 36 


Zangvvill . . 3- " 


Miller ... 28 


Rawnsley . . 14 


Tenn-int . . 15 


Zo^. . . 31, 3 


Mitford . . 32 


Raynor. . . 18 


Thompson . 14 


Z. Z. . . 30, 3',- 


LONDON WILLIAM HEINEMANN, 21 BEDFORD STREET, W.C. 



UC SOUTHER 



,N REGIONAL LBRARYFACILTY 



A A 000099072 1